Courses

Offering pattern: which courses are offered when

I. Courses offered every Fall and Spring semester

A. Applied lessons, ensembles, laboratories, graduate recital (undergraduate recitals also happen every fall and spring semester, but they are not a class you register for)

B. MUJS courses
MUJS 1360 Jazz Fundamentals
MUJS 1361 Jazz Aural Fundamentals
MUJS 1370 Jazz Fundamentals
MUJS 1371 Jazz Keyboard Fundamentals
MUJS 1470 Introduction to Jazz Recordings
MUJS 2360 Jazz Improvisation
MUJS 2370 Jazz Improvisation
MUJS 3120 Vocal Jazz Techniques
MUJS 3360 Advanced Jazz Improvisation
MUJS 3370 Advanced Jazz Improvisation
MUJS 4470 History of Jazz
MUJS 5430 Graduate Review of Jazz History (meets with MUJS 4470)
MUJS 5760 Jazz Arranging

II. Courses offered in Fall semester only
MUJS 1131 Jazz Performance Fundamentals
MUJS 3610 Jazz Arranging
MUJS 3920 Songwriting
MUJS 4610 Advanced Jazz Arranging
MUJS 5470 Conducting College Jazz Ensembles (also Summer I)
MUJS 5490 Advanced Jazz Improvisation
MUJS 5780 Jazz Styles & Analysis
MUJS 6010 Doctoral Seminar in Jazz History and Analysis

III. Courses offered in Spring semester only
MUJS 1132 Jazz Performance Fundamentals
MUJS 3470 Jazz Lecture Series
MUJS 3620 Jazz Arranging
MUJS 3900 Vocal Pedagogy for Non-Classical Styles
MUJS 4620 Advanced Jazz Arranging
MUJS 5440 Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies
MUJS 5480 Pedagogy of Jazz
MUJS 5540 Composition for the Media

IV. Courses offered in summer semesters
In summer 2015: 5-week summer I only: Jazz Lab Band
5-week I only: MUJS 5470, Conducting College Jazz Ensembles (requires concurrent enrollment in Summer Lab Band)
Other jazz courses may be offered during the summer depending on faculty availability.

V. Courses offered as needed when there is sufficient enrollment
MUJS 4120 Vocal Jazz Styles
MUJS 4630 Vocal Jazz Arranging
MUJS 5450 Jazz Historiography

Applied Study

Applied Instruction in Jazz Trumpet

Applied instruction in jazz trumpet is available. Contact Jay Saunders and Mike Steinel for further information.

Jay Saunders Lead Trumpet Masterclass, Spring 2007

Lead trumpet students of Jay Saunders spent the spring 2007 semester studying the style and sound of lead trumpeter Al Porcino. The list of recordings to study came from Al himself. The students then transcribed the lead parts and performed them just as Al did.

In the last two semesters, the students studied legendary lead trumpeters Conrad Gozzo and Eugene "Snooky" Young in the same manner. Please check the photo archives for pictures of Snooky when he visited our campus last year.

At a jazz trumpet departmental recital on April 24, 2007, trumpet students performed lead parts played by Al Porcino.

video clip 1 (mp4 format)

video clip 2 (mp4 format)


Jay Saunders, Evan Weiss


Jason Levi


Jay Saunders, Jason Levi


Jay Saunders, Justin Stanton

Drumset

See the Percussion area page.

How serious are you about playing lead trumpet?

Here at the University of North Texas, we’re very serious about helping you be the very best jazz musician you can possibly be.

For those of you who are interested in lead trumpet playing, we’ll help you mature so that you can not only physically play the parts, but can do so as consistently as possible. That being said, being physically able to perform lead trumpet parts is only 50% of the job. To understand the versatility, different time feels and styles you’ll need, we’ll analyze the great lead players of the past and study the successful lead players of the present. All of these aspects will help you find your own style in a mature musical environment with some of the most talented students in the world.

Most of our “lead” graduates go to their own chosen corner of the world to live their lives in performance and/or education. Many of the exes end up in the large musical centers of performance. In the past few years, Scott Englebright, Adolfo Acosta, Pete De Siena and Jamie Hovorka have had wonderful success getting their careers started in the national arena. Scott Englebright was not only featured w/Maynard – he has also split lead on many CD’s, including Carl Saunders’ band and was featured recreating Maynard’s solos on a BBC recording. Another ex-Maynard lead player, Adolfo Acosta is with Tower of Power and is split lead on many of Chris Walden’s CD’s. Pete De Siena is split lead on Bill Holman’s band, Gordon Goodwin’s band, Bob Florence’s band, Carl Saunders' band, Mike Barone’s band and has played on many national TV shows in Los Angeles. Jamie Hovorka was featured w/Maynard’s band, split lead on Bobby Darin's tours and plays in Kim Richmond’s Concert Jazz Band.

If we go back a little farther into North Texas’ past, we find:
Gary Grant (lead Woody Herman; lead trumpet on a host of important jazz and pop CD’s, TV shows and movies – one of the most important lead players in Los Angeles
Craig Johnson (lead w/Maynard, split lead – John Fedchock’s New York Big Band, Gotham Jazz Orch, Bill Mobley’s Jazz Orch., many jazz CD’s, lead on Broadway shows – New York
Frank Greene (lead w/Maynard, Lead Dizzy Gillespie’s All-Star Alumni Big Band, lead Bob Mintzer, split lead Gerald Wilson’s NY Big Band, many jazz CD’s, movies and lead on Broadway shows - New York
Dan Fornero (split lead on Gordon Godwins’ Big Phat Band – many TV and movie credits)-L.A.
Marvin Stamm (Stan Kenton, Woody Herman, Thad and Mel, lead Bob Mintzer)
Mike Williams (lead Count Basie band – last 18 years)
Jay Sollenberger (Chase, lead Maynard Ferguson, lead Stan Kenton) in Kansas City
Joe Rodriquez (lead Woody Herman and Buddy Rich) in San Francisco
Tom Delibro (lead Doc Severinson’s big band) 1st call Las Vegas lead player
Dean Pratt (lead, Buddy Rich, many New York bands) in New York
John Thomas (split lead, Woody Herman, lead Count Basie) in Los Angeles
Chuck Schmidt (Stan Kenton, lead Buddy Rich) retired
Larry Ford (Woody Herman, lead Stan Kenton, Bob Florence) deceased
Bill Stapleton (Woody Herman, Tom Jones) deceased
Carey Deadman- in Chicago
Jay Saunders (lead, Stan Kenton) in Dallas
Keith Jourdan (lead, Tom Jones, Engelbert Humperdinck) in Dallas
Dave Zeagler (Kenton) in Houston
Steve Rentschler in Europe
Brad Allison in Seattle
Marc Breithaupt (Duck Soup) in Austin
Bill Collins and Eric Guerrero in Dallas
Jack Wengrowski (lead, US Army Studio Band) – in Washington D.C.
Ric Steffen – in Nashville
Jack Evans (lead, Ray Charles) in Dallas
Updates, corrections and/or omissions? Please let me know – Jay Saunders

Jazz Applied Study for Saxophone

Concentration Proficiency For Saxophone: Jazz Studies Majors

First Year
All major and minor (harmonic, melodic, and jazz melodic) scales and arpeggios as well as chromatic scale - full range. Ferling 48 Etudes.
Repertoire: Lantier, Sicilienne; Bozza, Aria; Rueff, Chanson et Passepied.
Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.
Continuation of scales and major scales in broken thirds. Ferling 48 Etudes. Repertoire: Vivaldi Sonata in g minor; Bonneau, Suite; Lunde, Sonata. Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.

Second Year
Continuation of major/minor scales and arpeggios, whole tone and diminished scales; harmonic minor scales in broken thirds. Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices. Repertoire: Tcherepnine, Sonatine Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.
Continuation of scales and melodic minor scales in broken thirds; Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices.
Repertoire: Maurice, Tableaux de Provence; Milhaud, Scaramouche; van Delden, Sonatina. Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, John Coltrane transcriptions, etc.

Third Year
Continuation of major/minor scales and arpeggios, whole tone and diminished scales; harmonic minor scales in broken thirds. Major and minor scales in broken thirds and fourths. Selected jazz studies including personal transcriptions, solo analysis, and repertoire.

Fourth Year
Continuation of major/minor scales and arpeggios, whole tone and diminished scales; Major and minor scales in broken thirds and fourths. Selected jazz studies including personal transcriptions, solo analysis, and repertoire, etc.

Grading is based on following criteria:
1) Weekly preparation. Quality, consistency and quantity of preparation for each lesson is evaluated and graded.
2) Recital Performance. Each student is required to perform in two Saxophone Departmental Recitals.
3) Scale Jury: Each student will be given a specific scale jury in the last lesson of the semester. See Saxophone Proficiency Examination.
4) Jury Examination. Sign-up sheets will be in the Student Study the week before juries. Each student's Performance Level Evaluation assessed. See Saxophone Proficiency Examination.
5) Attendance at Saxophone Departmental Recitals, 12:00 noon each Monday is mandatory. A student missing more than three Saxophone Recitals per semester will lower his/her earned grade for the semester one whole level.

Concentration Proficiency For Saxophone: Music Education Majors; Composition and Theory Majors

First Year
All major and minor (harmonic, melodic, and jazz melodic) scales and arpeggios as well as chromatic scale - full range. Ferling 48 Etudes. Repertoire: Lantier, Sicilienne; Bozza, Aria; Rueff, Chanson et Passepied.
Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.
Continuation of scales and major scales in broken thirds. Ferling 48 Etudes. Repertoire: Vivaldi Sonata in g minor; Bonneau, Suite; Lunde, Sonata. Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.

Second Year
Continuation of major/minor scales and arpeggios, whole tone and diminished scales; harmonic minor scales in broken thirds. Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices. Repertoire: Tcherepnine, Sonatine Sportive; Heiden, Sonata; Jacobi, Sonata. Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.
Continuation of scales and melodic minor scales in broken thirds. Karg-Elert, 25 Caprices. Repertoire: Maurice, Tableaux de Provence; Milhaud, Scaramouche; van Delden, Sonatina. Selected jazz etudes: Charlie Parker-Omnibook, etc.

Third Year
Continuation of scales. Lacour 28 Etudes. Repertoire: Glazounov, Concerto; Creston, Sonata; Tomasi, Ballade. Selected jazz studies: John Coltrane transcriptions and jazz solo analysis.
Continuation of scales. Lacour 28 Etudes.
Repertoire: Ibert, Concertino da camera; Desenclos, Prélude, Cadence, et Finale; Bozza, Concertino. Selected jazz studies: personal transcriptions and jazz solo analysis.

Grading is based on following criteria:
1) Weekly preparation. Quality, consistency and quantity of preparation for each lesson is evaluated and graded.
2) Recital Performance. Each student is required to perform in two Saxophone Departmental Recitals.
3) Scale Jury: Each student will be given a specific scale jury in the last lesson of the semester. See Saxophone Proficiency Examination.
4) Jury Examination. Sign-up sheets will be in the Student Study the week before juries. Each student's Performance Level Evaluation assessed. See Saxophone Proficiency Examination.
5) Attendance at Saxophone Departmental Recitals, 12:00 noon each Monday is mandatory. A student missing more than three Saxophone Recitals per semester will lower his/her earned grade for the semester one whole level.

MUAC 1507, 3507, 5507, Jazz applied study for Bass

MUAC 1507, 3507, 5507, Jazz applied study for Bass
Lessons
The semester consists of thirteen sessions: ten 50 minute private lessons, one final evaluation, one group listening session, and one group "bass dialogue" session. At the listening session, we will listen to and discuss various recordings. The "bass dialogue" session will be another group session where the students will perform, with a rhythm section, a tune featuring the bass in some way. All present will discuss various aspects of what we hear. The group sessions will be scheduled well in advance, by consensus.
Instructor Information
Lynn Seaton Office: (940) 369-7639
Jazz Studies Office: (940) 565-3743
Objectives
To develop a good pizzicato sound and, if studying acoustic, arco and pizzicato sound. To expand the student's understanding of the role of the bass in jazz through the use of transcription, jazz and classical repertoire, and sight reading.
Texts
A collection of songs from the standard repertory such as "The Real Book".
A collection of solo transcriptions such as Paul Chambers Solos by Jim Stinnett; The Music of Oscar Pettiford by Volkes Nahmann; The Bass Tradition by Todd Coolman; The Charlie Parker Omnibook; Bebop Bass by Harold Miller; Jazz Solos for Bass by Lynn Seaton.
Other books may be suggested during the course of study.
Materials
A metronome
A book of manuscript paper
A stereo system to play music on for pleasure and study.
A tape recorder is helpful to record music and your self practicing.
A folder for collecting materials such as music, transcriptions, assignments and tune lists.
Class Work
Much class time will be spent on several areas of development. Among them are:
proper posture
proper sound production
pizzicato and arco on acoustic bass
major and minor modes and other jazz scales
arpeggios
transcription of recorded materials
walking bass lines
written and improvised solo conception
jazz standard repertory
classical repertoire
Assignments
Students are required to submit a complete transcribed walking bass line from a recording of their choice each semester. This is due on or before the 8th lesson. A cassette copy of the recording and a photo copy of the transcription should be handed in. You keep the original transcription.
A minimum of 10 tunes are to be memorized each semester; that means the melody, chords, scales, arpeggios, walking a bass line and soloing. The memorized tunes will be required whether they are covered in our lessons or not. It would be wise to include tunes that you do in other classes (such as ensembles, arranging or improvisation) as part of your tune learning.
Maintain a portfolio of the tunes you know and learn and the transcriptions you do throughout your study. By graduation, you will have many tunes that you know thoroughly. One of the things that makes for a successful musician is knowing many tunes.
Homework
Those who plan to do well in their lessons should plan to practice everyday including weekends. Playing music well is a long term commitment. Constant exercising is the only means of improvement. You will also be expected to write bass lines on tunes as assigned and practice the appropriate scales, arpeggios and melodies (see Assignments).
Grading
Your grade will be based on the following:
Midterm - At the midpoint of the lessons, students will be evaluated on the following: 1) sight-reading and 2) performing one of the required tunes; the melody, chords, scales, arpeggios, walking a bass line and soloing.
Transcription - Due on or before the 8th lesson. (See assignments.)
General progress - Students will be evaluated on the basis of their own progress, not by comparison to others.
Final jury - At the end of the semester, students will be evaluated on the following: 1) sight-reading, and 2) performing two of the ten required memorized tunes; the melody, chords, scales, arpeggios, walking a bass line and soloing.
Attendance
Attendance is mandatory. Two missed lessons without advance notice and permission of the instructor will result in the grade being lowered one degree. If the instructor must miss a lesson, a makeup will be scheduled. There will be no makeup lessons for unexcused student absences.
Dialogue
An important of learning is an open dialogue between the teacher and the student. Please feel free to call me or stop me in the hall to discuss anything.
Minimum Grade
A minimum grade of "B" is required of all jazz studies majors.
Americans with Disabilities Act
The College of Music complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act in making reasonable accommodation for qualified students with disability. If you have an established disability as defined in the Americans With Disabilities Act and would like to request accommodation, please see me as soon as possible.
Scholastic Honesty Policy
Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course, the removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the student's actions to the Office of the Dean of Students and to the Office of the Dean of the College of Music.

MUAC 1526, 3526 and 5526, Jazz Applied Study for Guitar

Undergraduate jazz guitar majors are required to successfully complete eight semesters of jazz guitar lessons. There is no requirement for classical guitar study.

Graduate students must complete four semesters, the final semester is in preparation for a recital.

Course Prerequisites: Students must have passed the entrance audition and have been accepted as a jazz studies major to enroll in MUAC 1526 (lower division undergraduate) or 5526 (graduate).

MUAC 1526- Four semesters must be taken at this level. The student must earn the grade of A or B to enroll in lessons the following semester.

Lower Division Barrier Exam- Students must pass the Improvisation Continuation Exam in order to be accepted to upper division (3526) lessons.

MUAC 3526- The student must earn the grade of A or B to enroll in lessons the following semester. Four semesters are required at this level.

MUAC 5526- Students who have been accepted as graduate jazz studies majors may enroll for these lessons. As in all classes and lessons, in order to continue the following semester the student must earn a grade of A or B.

Private Study Objectives:
1) To improve individual technique and musicality

2) Continue to learn more jazz repertoire

3) To improve reading skills through the use of etudes in the jazz and classical tradition

The following are recommended texts:
Violin Studies
42 Studies or Caprices by R. Kreutzer
J.S. Bach Solo Violin Sonatas and Partitas

Jazz and/or Saxophone Studies
The Jazz Conception by Jim Snidero
14 Blues and Funk Etudes and/or 14 Jazz and Funk Etudes by Bob Mintzer
The Charlie Parker Omnibook

Guitar Studies
Joe Pass Chord Solos
Jimmy Raney Volume 20 (Jamey Aebersold)
Jimmy Raney Duets Volume 29
Melodic Studies and Compositions for Guitar: A Reading Workout for Serious Musicians (Fred Hamilton)
The Barry Galbraith Series:
Book 1- The Fingerboard Workbook
Book 2-Daily Exercises in the Melodic and Harmonic Minor Modes
Book 3-Guitar Comping
Book 4-J.S. Bach Two Part Inventions for Two Guitars

4) Transcriptions-it is recommended that two major jazz solos be learned each semester to be performed at midterm and at the final jury. It is recommended that students bring in smaller projects of transcribed phrases or heads during the semester. The final transcription must be performed for the teacher on the lesson prior to the jury.

5) To develop and expand repertoire of standards and jazz compositions. Always try to find a good recording of the tunes being studied. A good way to approach learning repertoire is to choose an album or two and learn everything on it, rather than the "fakebook-only" approach.

Criteria for Grading Private Lessons
Weekly Grades:
The student must demonstrate good weekly preparation of materials, a willingness and desire to dig into the music and show self-motivation in order to receive an A or B. If the student receives a C or lower, he/she will be counseled not to enroll for lessons the following semester. Each week's lessons will be given a grade and averaged at the end of the semester and will comprise 70% of the final grade.

Juries:
At the end of each semester, the student will perform for a panel of guitar faculty and teaching fellows. That will consist of repertoire studied during the semester, which must be memorized and two of those pieces will be chosen by the guitar faculty for solo performance. In addition a transcription will be performed with the recording. The jury will be graded by the applied teachers and the grades averaged for the remaining 30%.

Attendance Policy
You are scheduled to meet with the applied instructor 13 times during the semester. The first week of classes there are no lessons and the last week is juries, so consequently 12 lessons are graded. It is up to the student to make it to all lessons unless illness or unavoidable conflicts occur. Speak to the instructor in advance if possible so as not to waste his time. If the instructor must miss a lesson a makeup will be scheduled. There will be no makeup lessons for unexcused student absences.

Continuation
If you receive a C or lower in lessons, you will be asked to sit out for a semester and audition again the following semester.

Jazz Guitar Departmentals
Every Friday 1:30-3:00 there will be performances by guitar students in Kenton Hall, MU282. All students taking guitar lessons are required to perform once each semester. If inadequate preparation causes the instructor to counsel you not to perform, it may affect your semester grade. Attendance is mandatory for all guitarists registered for MUJS 1131 or 1132, guitar ensembles and lessons.

MUAC 1532, MUAC 3531, MUJS 5531, and Jazz Piano Departmental, Applied Jazz Piano

Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU #272
Phone: (940) 565-2229
Email:

Prerequisite:
MUJS 1371, MUJS 1131, MUJS 1132, and two semesters of 1500-level applied classical concentration lessons.
Classical lessons will take place during Freshman (2cr.), Sophmore (1cr.) and Junior years (1cr). Jazz lessons will take place during Sophmore (1cr.), Junior (1cr.) and Senior years (2cr). A required 50-minute jazz recital is typically done during the last semester of study.

Course Content:
Upon completion of these three years of study, the student must display necessary proficiency with:
• II/V/I progressions (major and minor in all keys)
• Blues and Rhythm Changes (all keys)
• Orchestration(voicings, voice leading, etc.)
• Repertoire
• Etudes/technical studies (which will include R.H/L.H independence, tone control, relaxation, and pedal technique)
• Solo piano techniques
• Transcriptions
• Improvisation
• Evolution of jazz piano and its innovators

Mid-Term/Final Jury:
By mid-term, one published jazz solo piano selection is due for a grade. At the end of dead week, the student will perform a jury, which will include:
• Transcription (performed by memory with original recording)
• Repertoire (from applied tune list- by memory with a rhythm section)

Semester Grading:
In order to receive an A or B, the student must demonstrate good weekly preparation of materials and a desire to master this art form. Each lesson will be given a grade (5%/lesson) comprising a total of 65% of the final grade. The midterm exam will count for 10% (solo piece). The final jury exam will count for 25%.

Attendance Policy:
You are scheduled to meet with the applied instructor for 13 regular lesson times during each semester. There are no lessons during first week of classes. There will be no make-up lessons for unexcused student absences.
No unexcused absences are permitted.

Continuation Policy:
If you receive a C or lower in lessons, you will not be eligible to participate in regular lessons the following semester. In addition, the student will be required to re-audition before returning to private lessons.
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MUJS 5531
Applied Graduate Jazz Piano
Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU 272
Phone: (940) 565-2229
Email:

Prerequisite:
MUJS 1371, MUJS 1131, MUJS 1132, and six semesters of undergraduate applied jazz piano lessons

Course Content:
Upon completion of these three semesters of study, students must display proficiency with:
• Repertoire
• Orchestration (voicings, voice leading, etc.)
• Etudes/technical studies
• Solo piano techniques
• Transcriptions
• Improvisational skills
• Trio playing
• Trio arranging
• The evolution of jazz piano and its innovators, to include an oral presentation during the third semester of study on a selected jazz piano innovator. In addition, a 10-page paper on the history of jazz piano is due by the end of the third semester of study. The paper will serve as a preparation for the graduate oral exam.

Mid-Term/Jury:
By mid-term, one published solo piano selection and six tunes from the applied tune list (not addressed during lessons ) are due for a grade. During dead-week, students will perform a jury exam, which will include one transcription (performed along with the original recording) and eight tunes from the applied tune list that have been addressed througout the semester. Mid-term and jury exams are to be performed by memory.

Semester Grading:
Students must demonstrate good weekly preparation of materials and a desire to master this art form. Each lesson will be given a grade (5% per lesson) for a total of 65% of their final grade. The mid-term exam will count for 10%. The final jury exam will count for 25%.

Attendance Policy:
You are scheduled to meet with the applied instructor for 13 regular lesson times during each semester. There are no lessons during first week of classes. There will be no make-up lessons for unexcused student absences. No unexcused absences are permitted.

Continuation Policy:
If you receive a C or lower in lessons, you will not be eligible to participate in regular lessons the following semester. In addition, the student will be required to re-audition before returning to private lessons.

Jazz Piano Departmental:
Undergraduate and graduate students who are registered for applied jazz piano lessons must perform during one of the weekly scheduled jazz piano departmental gatherings. Departmental performances are held on Tuesday's 4:00-4:50PM in room 282 in the fall, and on Friday's 2:00-2:50PM in room 262 in the spring.

Vocal Jazz

For information on applied instruction in vocal jazz go here.

Conducting

MUJS 5470, Conducting College Jazz Ensembles

General Information

Requirements:
Each student will perform as a band member on a regular basis.
Each student will provide an acceptable substitute when conducting and/or when absent from class.
Each student will be required to write a critical review of three books from a reading list to be provided the first week of classes. Papers are due on Tuesday of "Pre-Finals Week."
Class attendance requirements will be in accordance with the written policy found in the current College of Music handbook.

Reference Books
1. Antrim, Doran K., Secrets of Dance Band Success, New York: Mills Music, Inc., 1936.
2. Baker, David N., Jazz Pedagogy: A comprehensive Method of Jazz Education for Teacher and Student. Chicago, IL: Maher Publications, 1979.
3. Ferguson, Tom and Sandy Feldstein, The Jazz Rock Ensemble: A Conductor's and Teacher's Guide. Port Washington, NY: Alfred Publishing Co., 1976.
4. Hall, M. E., Teacher's Guide to the High School Stage Band. Elkhart, IN: H. & A. Selmer, Inc., 1961.
5. Henry, Robert E., The Jazz Ensemble: A Guide to Technique. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1981.
6. Kusmich, John and Lee Bash, Complete Guide to Instrumental Jazz Instruction: Techniques for Developing a Successful School Jazz Program. West Nyack, NY: Parker Publishing Company, Inc., 1984.
7. LaPorta, John, Developing the School Jazz Ensemble: Director's manual. Boston, MA: Berklee Pres Publications, 1965.
8. Lawn, Richard, The Jazz Ensemble Director's Manual: A Handbook of Practice Methods and Materials for the Educator. Oskaloosa, IA: C. L. Barnhouse Co., 1981.
9. Leinsdorf, Erich, The Composer's Advocate: A Radical Orthodoxy for Musicians. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1981.
10. Mancini, Henry, Sounds and Scores. Northridge Music, Inc., 1962
11. Nestico, Sammy, The Complete Arranger. Fenwood Music Co., Inc. 1993.
12. Sturm, Fred, Changes Over Time: The Evolution of Jazz Arranging. Advance Music, 1995.
13. Wiskerchen, George, Developmental Techniques for the School Dance Band Musician. Boston, MA: Berklee Press Publications, 1961.
14. Wright, Rayburn, Inside the Score. Delevan, NY: Kendor Music, Inc., 1982.

Fundamentals

MUJS 1360, 1361, 1370 and 1371 are prerequisites to the improvisation or arranging courses.

MUJS 1360, Jazz Fundamentals I

This course is 100% online delivery.

Textbook: The Jazz Language by Dan Haerle

Grading: The semester grade is based on:

Seven Assignments (5% each) 35%
Seven Lesson Quizzes (5% each) 35%
One 50 minute Mid-term Exam 15%
One 50 minute Final Exam 15%
Total:
100%

Lessons: These include lessons on each subject covered in the course. Musical examples may be played by clicking on them. Also, at the end of each lesson, there is a list of Frequently Asked Questions (and their answers) on the lesson subject.

Assignments: Assignments must be completed by the date indicated on the semester calendar.

Quizzes: A ten minute quiz is given on each lesson for reading comprehension. Each lesson quiz must be completed by the date indicated on the semester calendar.

Semester Calendar: All assignments, quizzes and exams must be completed by the dates indicated on the calendar. However, a student is welcome to work ahead of schedule if he or she chooses. All work must be done in the prerequisite order, however.

Prerequisite Order: There is a logical progression through the work in the
class which must be observed. For example, Assignment 1 must be completed before Quiz 1 which must be completed before Assignment 2, etc. The prerequisite order for all work is shown in chronological order below.
Online Chats: There will be regular weekly chats which offer students the opportunity to discuss topics with the instructor online. These are scheduled from 6 pm to 7 pm on Mondays (with one exception) and are published on the Semester Calendar. Click on Class Comunications, Online Chat and General Chat for MUJS1360DH.

Office: If a student is on campus, he or she may come in during office hours for help with class work, to discuss performance on examinations and to receive advice on what and how to study. Students who are not on campus are encouraged to attend the scheduled on-line conferences with the instructor. Office phone: (940) 565-2229. Email: pleaseuse the email within WebCT.

This outline provides the necessary information and course expectations for a student to succeed in the course. It is the student's responsibility to take quizzes and exams as scheduled and to complete assignments on time!

Prerequisite Order of Assignments and Quizzes*
Assignment 1: Intervals
Quiz 1: Intervals
Assignment 2: Basic Chord Construction
Quiz 2: Basic Chord Construction
Assignment 3: Major Modes
Quiz 3: Major Modes
Assignment 4: Basic Substitution & Function
Quiz 4: Basic Substitution & Function
Exam 1: Lessons 1, 2, 3 and 4
Assignment 5: Thirteenth Chords
Quiz 5: Thirteenth Chords
Assignment 6: Harmonic Minor Modes
Quiz 6: Harmonic Minor Modes
Assignment 7: Voicing and Connecting Chords
Quiz 7: Voicing and Connecting Chords
Exam 2: Lessons 5, 6, and 7
Work may be completed earlier than the dates in the Semester Calendar but must be done in the prerequisite order shown in this outline.

Semester Calendar
Dates are appproximate, as this sample syllabus refers to a previous semester. Always check the WebCT class site for the most current information.

Mon., Aug. 28, 12 to 1 pm Mandatory orientation meeting in room 262
Mon., Aug. 28, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Sept. 1, 11 pm Assignment 1 should be completed
Mon., Sept. 4, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Sept. 8, 11 pm Quiz 1 should be completed
Mon., Sept. 11, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Sept. 15, 11 pm Assignment 2 should be completed
Mon., Sept. 18, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Sept. 22, 11 pm Quiz 2 should be completed
Mon., Sept. 25, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Sept. 29, 11 pm Assignment 3 should be completed
Mon., Oct. 2, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Oct. 6, 11 pm Quiz 3 should be completed
Wed., Oct. 11, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Oct. 13, 11 pm Assignment 4 should be completed
Mon., Oct. 16, 6 to 7 pm
On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Oct. 20, 11 pm Quiz 4 should be completed
Mon., Oct. 23, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Oct. 27, 11 pm Exam 1 should be completed
Mon., Oct. 30, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Nov. 3, 11 pm Assignment 5 should be completed
Mon., Nov. 6, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Nov. 10, 11 pm Quiz 5 should be completed
Mon., Nov. 13, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Nov. 17, 11 pm Assignment 6 should be completed
Mon., Nov. 20, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Nov. 24, 11 pm Quiz 6 should be completed
Mon., Nov. 27, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Dec. 1, 11 pm Assignment 7 should be completed
Mon., Dec. 4, 6 to 7 pm On line chat with Dan Haerle
Fri., Dec. 8, 11 pm Quiz 7 should be completed
Mon., Dec. 11, 11 pm Exam 2 should be completed

MUJS 1361, Jazz Aural Fundamentals

From the undergraduate catalog:

1361. Jazz Aural Fundamentals. 1 hour. (0;2) Drill in ear-training of the melodic, harmonic and rhythmic materials that are idiomatic to jazz. Includes the singing of jazz chords and scales and the singing, dictation and transcription of jazz melodies, rhythms and chord progressions.

MUJS 1370, Jazz Fundamentals II

This syllabus is currently being revised.

MUJS 1371, Jazz Keyboard Fundamentals

Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU #272
Phone: (940) 565-2229
Email:

Instructor: Teaching Assistant- TBA

Required Textbook: Jazz Piano Voicing Skills (by Dan Haerle)

Course description:
Keyboard realization of jazz harmony with typical idiomatic voicings. The
emphasis is on developing the ability to perform a number of chord progressions.

Skill Categories To Be Studied:
• Block chords
• Voicings built on the 3rd and 7th
• Diatonic 7th chords
• Cycle progressions
• II-V-I progressions in all major keys
• II-V-I progressions in all minor keys

Course Content:
• Skills (refer to schedule below)
• For application, two songs from the standard repertoire (Confirmation &
Joy Spring) are included for testing at the end of the semester (see schedule
below)
• Skill Tests (Pass or Fail- two trials in a given tempo by memory)
• Tune Tests (graded A-D- may read chord changes with two trials in a
given tempo)

Grading:
• Skills - 3%each X 27 = 81%
• Tunes -10%each X 2 = 20% (failure to pass both tunes will result in an
automatic "C" in the class)

Attendance:
Four unexcused absences are permitted, however beyond the 2nd unexcused
absence, each (unexcused) absence will lower your final semester grade by one
letter grade. Excused absences should be cleared in advance in person.

Semester Schedule
Monday/Tuesday Wednesday/Thursday
Week 1 Introduction Lecture: skill 1-6
Week 2 Practice Test: skill 1-3
Week 3 Test: skill 4-6 Lecture: skill 9-15
Week 4 Practice Test: skill 9-11
Week 5 Test: skill 12-15 Lecture: skill 19-20
Week 6 Practice Test: skill 19-20
Week 7 Lecture: skill 37(a-d) Practice
Week 8 Test: skill 37(a-d) Lecture: skill 38(a-d)
Week 9 Practice Test: skill 38(a-d)
Week 10 Lecture: skill 40-43 Practice
Week 11 Test: skill 40-41 Practice
Week 12 Test: skill 42-43 Lecture: 2 Tunes
Week 13 Practice Test: Tune 1
Week 14 Practice Test: Tune 2
Week 15 Make-up test Make-up test

Compliance with Federal Statutes:
The College of Music complies with "The Americans With Disabilities Act", in making reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disability. If you have an established disability as defined in this act and would like to request accommodations, please see me as soon as possible.

Scholastic Honesty Policy:
Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course, the removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the student's actions to the office of the Dean of Students and to the office of the Dean of the College of Music.

History, Analysis, and Research

History courses overview including offering pattern (revised 02-apr-09)

The jazz history, analysis, and research course offerings are:

MUJS 1470, Introduction to Jazz Recordings
MUJS 3470, Jazz Lecture Series
MUJS 4470, History of Jazz
MUJS 5440, Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies (prereq: 4470)
MUJS 5450, Studies in Jazz History (prereq: 4470)
MUJS 5780, Jazz Styles and Analysis

The offering pattern of the undergraduate history courses is:
MUJS 1470: fall and spring semesters
MUJS 3470: spring semester only
MUJS 4470: fall and spring semesters

Starting in fall 2009, the offering pattern of the graduate history, analysis, and research courses will be:

Every fall: MUJS 5780 Jazz Styles & Analysis

Every spring: MUJS 5450, Studies in Jazz History (will soon be retitled Jazz Historiography). Prerequisite: MUJS 4470 History of Jazz (soon a graduate course number will apply to this class: MUJS 5430, Graduate Review of Jazz History).

Both fall and spring: MUJS 5440 Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies. Prerequisite: MUJS 4470 History of Jazz (soon a graduate course number will apply to this class: MUJS 5430, Graduate Review of Jazz History).

For MUJS 5430, Graduate Review of Jazz History, students will attend the class meetings of MUJS 4470, History of Jazz, and do all of the assigned work, and meet in one additional 50-minute session each week with the professor to do graduate-level reading, discussion, and writing.

If you have any questions about this, please contact me at

.
John Murphy

Jazz history profiency exam

This exam is given by appointment at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters for undergraduates who would like to test out of MUJS 4470, History of Jazz (undergraduate) and graduate students who need to test out of MUJS 4470, which is a catalog prerequisite for MUJS 5440, Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies.

The exam has two parts. To receive proficiency credit, students must pass parts 1 and 2 with a score of 85% or above on each part. Students who do not pass will need to take MUJS 5430, which meets with the MUJS 4470 class and has different syllabus requirements from those for the undergraduates (example: longer research paper).

Part 1. A 100-question short-answer test on the origins of jazz, the musical style and major figures of each period of jazz history, and connections between jazz and American history in the 20th century. The questions will ask for a term, name, date, phrase, or sentence and will use fill-in format, not multiple choice or true/false. A good way to study for this part is to read any high-quality recent jazz history textbook, such as Jazz by Scott DeVeaux and Gary Giddins (Norton), which is the current textbook for MUJS 4470/5430, or Mark Tucker's article, "Jazz," in New Grove II, which is available in Grove Music Online via the Music Library's electronic resources. To use this online via the UNT library, EUID authentication is required. New students won't have the proper level of EUID authentication until they are registered for classes. See if you can locate the article in print in New Grove II (the multivolume Grove Encyclopedia of Music and Musicians, not the New Grove Dictionary of Jazz) or online via your present university.

Part 2. A 20-question listening test, with examples drawn from all periods of jazz history. The questions will ask for the artist, title, and approximate date of the example, and a specific comment on its style and historical significance. A good way to study for this part is to review the contents of Jazz: The Smithsonian Anthology. Exam listening examples will be selected from this anthology.

For further information on this exam, or on course requirements and prerequisites for jazz history, analysis, and research courses, contact John Murphy. Last updated 2015-10-27

MUJS 1470, Introduction to Jazz Recordings

MUJS 1470.001, MWF 9-9:50, 3 credit hours, room 282
Jay Saunders, room 275, 369-7951,

Office hours: TBA each semester
MUJS 1470 was designed for entering jazz majors, but it may also be taken by those with a desire to learn more about this music. It is intended to:
1. familiarize jazz students with the sounds of most of the important and influential stylists, improvisers, and arranger/composers in the post swing era of jazz history
2. provide a basic list of 'listening source materials' that students can use throughout their study of jazz
3. give a brief overview of jazz history that will provide some perspective until they take MUJS 4470, History of Jazz
The required text for this class is McCalla, Jazz, A Listener's Guide, 3rd edition, Prentice-Hall.
There are 5 exams during the semester and a final examination.
The course begins with a study of the most important large ensembles. The leaders, their arrangers, some of the most important sidemen and the various instrumentations they used to get their unique sounds are taken into consideration. Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Stan Kenton, Woody Herman, Gil Evans, Maynard Ferguson, Buddy Rich, Bill Holman, Terry Gibbs, Gerald Wilson, Don Ellis, Quincy Jones, Oliver Nelson, Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones/ Mel Lewis, McCoy Tyner, Bob Florence, Bob Mintzer, The Mingus Big Band, Maria Schneider, Toshiko Akiyoshi, Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, John Fedchock, Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Tom Kubis, Clayton/ Hamilton, Jack Sheldon, Kim Richmond, Gordon Goodwin, Clarke/Boland, Peter Herbolzheimer, The Metropole Orchestra, Rob McConnell, The WDR Big Band, Norrbotten Big Band and the studio projects of Joe Henderson, Pat Williams, Don Sebesky, Chuck Owen, Marty Paich, The GRP Big Band, Frank Mantooth, Carla Bley, and Dave Holland are examined.
Next is a survey of (most of) the most influential soloists (and their groups) from the 50's and 60's. We begin with Julian "Cannonball" Adderley and continue with the groups of: Clifford Brown/Max Roach, Gene Ammons/Sonny Stitt, Art Blakey, Dave Brubeck, Kenny Burrell, John Coltrane, Chick Corea, Benny Carter, Ornette Coleman, Sonny Clark, Miles Davis, Eric Dolphy, Kenny Dorham, Bill Evans, Jim Hall, Booker Ervin, Art Farmer, Carl Fontana, Erroll Garner, Dizzy Gillespie, Johnny Griffin, Grant Green, Stan Getz, Dexter Gordon, Herbie Hancock, Joe Henderson, Freddie Hubbard, Milt Jackson, J.J. Johnson, Lee Konitz, Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, Wes Montgomery, Thelonious Monk, Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Oscar Peterson, Chet Baker/Gerry Mulligan, Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Frank Rosolino, McCoy Tyner, Larry Young, Wayne Shorter, Horace Silver, Jimmy Smith, Woody Shaw, Sonny Stitt, Stanley Turrentine and Lester Young. Many other very important jazz soloists like: Joe Pass, Ray Brown, Wynton Kelly, George Coleman, Art Pepper, Carmell Jones, Connie Kay, Elvin Jones, Jimmy Rowles, et. al. are also noted as sidemen on these very important recordings.
We finish the semester with an examination of many of the important and influential jazz vocalists. Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Joe Williams, Billie Holiday, Billy Eckstine, Sarah Vaughan, Betty Carter, Carmen McRae, Ernestine Anderson, Nancy Wilson, June Christy, Peggy Lee, Anita O'Day, Chris Conner, Shirley Horn, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Patti Austin, Natalie Cole, Diane Schuur, Diana Krall, Mel Tormé, Mark Murphy, Kurt Elling, Bob Dorough, Mose Allison, Michael Franks, Tony Bennett and Bobby McFerrin are covered. (Jazz vocalists Dianne Reeves, Kevin Mahogany and Johnny Hartman are heard earlier.) Lastly, we check out the vocal groups of: Lambert, Hendricks and Ross; Les Double Six; The Swingle Singers; The Four Freshmen; The Hi-Lo's; The Singers Unlimited, Take 6, The New York Voices and The Real Group.

MUJS 3470, Jazz Lecture Series

Each spring semester, the jazz lecture series brings acclaimed artists to campus to speak, play, and answer students' questions.

Here is a complete list of the guest artists since the series began:

MUJS 3470, The Jazz Lecture Series

1982
Bob Brookmeyer (Trb/Arr)
Joanne Brackeen (Piano)
Leonard Feather (Critic)
Dizzy Gillespie (Trumpet)
Frank Foster (Saxophone)
Tom Scott (Saxophone)
Clark Terry (Trumpet)
Jackie Cain/Roy Kral (Vocal)
Grady Tate (Drums)
Don Sebesky (Arranging)

1983
Willis Conover (Broadcaster)
Jimmy Heath (Saxophone)
Tom Harrell (Trumpet)
Mel Lewis (Drums)
Tommy Flanagan (Piano)
Bobbi Humphrey (Flute)
Herb Ellis (Guitar) alum
Johnny Smith (Guitar)
Wayne Andre (Trombone)
Jimmy Guiffre (Clarinet) alum

1984
Nat Hentoff (Critic)
Natt Adderley (Trumpet)
Michael Brecker (Tenor)
Marvin Stamm (Trumpet) alum
Mark Murphy(Vocal)
David Liebman (Saxophone)
Free Flight (Jazz Quartet)
Ron Carter (Bass)
Elvin Jones (Drums)
Tal Farlow (Guitar)

1985
Burt Korall (Critic)
Bill Watrous (Trombone)
Randy Brecker (Trumpet)
Joe Henderson (Saxophone)
Billy Taylor (Piano)
Peter Erskine (Drums)
Lee Konitz (Saxophone)
Emily Remler (Guitar)
George Mraz (Bass)
Diane Reeves (Vocal)

1986
George Simon (Historian)
Dave Weckl (Drums)
Bob Berg (Saxophone)
Dave Holland (Bass)
Jon Faddis (Trumpet)
Hal Galper (Piano)
Eddie Daniels (Clarinet)
Jiggs Whigham (Trombone)
Barry Harris (Piano)
Jim Hall (Guitar)

1987
Dan Morgenstern (Historian)
Eddie Gomez (Bass)
Jim Pugh (Trombone)
Gene Bertoncini (Guitar)
Kenny Barron (Piano)
Danny Gottlieb (Drums)
Conte Condoli (Trumpet)
Jerry Bergonzi (Saxophone)
Buddy DeFranco (Clarinet)
Jim McNeely (Piano)

1988
Lewis Porter (Historian)
Joe Morello (Drums)
Bobby Shew (Trumpet)
J. J. Johnson (Trombone)
John Patitucci (Bass)
John Scofield (Guitar)
Mary Fettig (Saxophone)
Frank Wess (Saxophone)
James Williams (Piano)
Ray Brown (Arranger)

1989
Gunther Schuller (Composer)
Slide Hampton (Trombone)
Adam Nussbaum (Drums)
Don Grolnick(Piano)
Jamey Aebersold (Saxophone)
Lew Soloff (Trumpet)
Pat LaBarbera (Saxophone)
Steve Kahn (Guitar)
Jeff Andrews (Bass)
Dick Oatts (Saxophone)

1990
Milt Hinton (Bass)
Tim Hagans (Trumpet)
Chuck Wayne (Guitar)
Curtis Fuller (Trombone)
Charlie Persip (Drums)
Clifford Jordan (Saxophone)
Dick Hyman (Piano)

1991
Joe Lovano (Saxophone)
Gary Peacock (Bass)
Bill Reichenbach (Trombone)
Gary Burton (Vibes)
Mulgrew Miller (Piano)
Terrence Blanchard (Trumpet)
Jimmy Cobb (Drums)
Derek Smith (Piano)

1992
Marvin Stamm (Trumpet) alum
Joey Calderazzo (Piano)
Pete Christlieb (Saxophone)
Buster Williams (Bass)
Alan Dawson (Drums)
Chuck Findley (Trumpet)
Barney Kessel (Guitar)
Steve Turre (Trombone) alum

1993
Conrad Herwig (Trombone) alum
Billy Higgins (Drums)
Ray Brown (Bass)
Lyle Mayes (Piano) alum
Houston Person (Saxophone)
Bill Frisell (Guitar)
Red Rodney (Trumpet)

1994
Horace Silver (Piano)
Andy Laverne (Piano)
David Friesen (Bass)
Ted Nash (Saxophone)
Mick Goodrick (Guitar) alum
Robin Eubanks (Trombone)
Bob Belden (Saxophone) alum

1995
Charles McPherson (Saxophone)
Bucky Pizzarelli (Guitar)
Jeff Hamilton (Drums)
Kenny Werner (Piano)
Ray Anderson (Trombone)
Steve Swallow (Bass)
Doc Cheatham (Trumpet)

1996
Eddie Bert (Trombone)
Marc Johnson (Bass) alum
Bill Mays (Piano)
Unified Jazz Ensemble (Group)
Jack Petersen (Guitar) alum
Victor Lewis (Drums)
Byron Stripling (Trumpet) alum

1997 - UNT Alumni
Billy Harper (Saxophone) alum
Steve Houghton (Drums) alum
Marvin Stamm (Trumpet) alum
Lou Marini, Jr. (Saxophone) alum
Bob Dorough (Piano) alum
Herb Ellis (Guitar) alum
Dennis Irwin (Bass) alum
Slide Hampton (trombone)

1998
Hal Crook (Trombone)
Lynne Arriale (Piano)
Gary Foster (Saxophone)
David Liebman (Saxophone)
Gary Grant (Trumpet) alum
Rufus Reid (Bass)
Louis Hayes (Drumset)
Pat Martino (Guitar)

1999
Jimmy Owens (Trumpet)
Todd Coolman (Bass)
Dan Higgins (Saxophone) alum
Jim McNeely (Piano/Composer)
Fred Hersch (Piano)
Mike Stern (Guitar)
Ed Neumeister (Trombone)
Lewis Nash (Drums)

2000
Bryan Lynch (Trumpet)
Kenny Wheeler (Trumpet/Composer)
Scott Whitfield (Trombone) alum
Ronnie Cuber (Saxophone)
Bill Crow (Bass)
Joe Beck (Guitar)

2001
Michael Davis & Bill Reichenbach (trombone)
Russ Ferrante (piano)
Ray Brown (bass)
Michael & Randy Brecker (saxophone, trumpet)
Tim Ries (saxophone) alum
Andrew Cyrille (drums)
Mark Gould (trumpet)
Peter Bernstein (guitar)

2002
Scott Wendholt (trumpet)
Steve Gilmore (bass)
Bob McChesney (trombone)
Bob Brookmeyer (trombone/composer)
John Abercrombie (guitar)
Benny Green (piano)
Sam Rivers (saxophone)
John Von Ohlon (drums) alum

2003
Harold Jones (drum set)
Rich Perry (saxophone)
Maria Schneider (composer)
Jiggs Wigham (trombone)
Barry Ries (trumpet/drums) alum
and others...will be added

2004
Roger Kellaway (piano)
Jimmy Bruno (guitar)
Keter Betts (bass)
Dave Douglas (composer/trumpet)
Jim Rotondi (trumpet)
Ari Hoenig (drum set)
Slide Hampton (trombone)
Jim Snidero (saxophone) alum

2005
Jerry Hahn (guitar)
Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet)
Hilton Ruiz (piano)
Phil Woods (saxophone)
Paul McKee (trombone)
Jeff Watts (drums)
Eddie Gomez (bass)

2006
John Vidacovich (drums)
Makoto Ozone (piano)
Bill Holman (composer/arranger) and Pete Christlieb (saxophone)
Dave Stryker (guitar)
Snooky Young (trumpet)
Andy Martin (trombone)
Marc Johnson (bass; alumnus)

2007
Wycliffe Gordon, Trombone
John Stowell, Guitar
Clay Jenkins, Trumpet. alumnus
Ronald Shannon Jackson, Drums
Rufus Reid, Bass
Dave Pietro, Saxophone, alumnus
J.D. Walter, voice (alumnus)
Kevin Hays, Piano

2008
Taylor Eigsti (Piano)
Jay Leonhart (Bass)
Chris Potter (Tenor Saxophone)
Bruce Forman (Guitar)
John Abercrombie (Guitar)
Steve Davis (Trombone)
Frank Greene (Trumpet, alumnus)
Nasheet Waits (Drums)

2009
Mike Moreno, guitar
Chuck Berghofer, bass
Dave Brubeck Quartet and conductor Russell Gloyd (UNT alumnus)
Curtis Fuller, trombone
Ingrid Jensen, trumpet
Billy Hart, drum
Tim Warfield, saxophone
José Bowen, jazz scholar and musician
Tierney Sutton, voice, and her band, including Ray Brinker (UNT alumnus)

2010
Ron Stout (trumpet)
Roberta Gambarini (voice)
Lyle Mays (piano), Gomez artist, UNT alumnus
Jimmy Cobb (drums)
Wess Anderson (saxophone)
Vic Juris (guitar)
Michael Formanek (bass)
Vincent Gardner (trombone)

2011
Marvin Stamm (trumpet)
Steve Turre (trombone)
Larry Goldings (keyboard)
Adam Nussbaum (drums)
Kurt Rosenwinkel (guitar)
Darcy James Argue (composer)
Bill Moring (bass)
Ravi Coltrane (saxophone)

2012
Carol Welsman, vocalist
Rakalam (Bob) Moses, drums
Dave Kikoski, piano
John Clayton, bass
Mary Halvorson, guitar
Jason Marshall, baritone saxophone
Brian Lynch, trumpet
Steve Turre, trombone

2013
Corey Christiansen, guitar
Carl Saunders, trumpet
Gary Hobbs, drumset
Peter Erskine, drumset
Jean-Michel Pilc, piano
Greg Osby, saxophone
Mike Dease, trombone
Christian McBride, bass

2014
Jeremy Pelt, trumpet
Billy Harper, saxophone
Julian Lage, guitar
Marshall Gilkes, trombone
Ryan Truesdell, composer/arranger
Phil Markowitz, piano
Bob Cranshaw, bass
Joey Baron, drums

2015
Bobby McFerrin, voice
Peter Bernstein, guitar
Tim Hagans, trumpet
Rudresh Mahanthappa, saxophone
Andre Hayward, trombone
John Goldsby, bass
Chuck Owen, composer
Lewis Nash, drumset
Manuel Valera, piano

2016
James Morrison, trumpet/multi-instrumentalist
Adam Rogers, guitar
Golden Buddha Jazz Orchestra, from China
Danilo Pérez, piano
Kate McGarry, voice
Rudy Royston, drumset
Will Vinson, saxophone
Bob Curnow, composer/arranger (visit will occur in fall 2016)
Bruce Gertz, bass
John Allred, trombone

2017
Ignacio Berroa, drums
Marcus Printup, trumpet
Stefon Harris, composer, vibraphone
Steve Cotter, guitar
Ben Patterson, trombone
Charles McPherson, saxophone
Steve Bailey, bass
Andy LaVerne, piano
Vincent Gardner, trombone, composer
Charenée Wade, vocalist

MUJS 4470, History of Jazz

Here's the syllabus for Spring 2014. John Murphy teaches this course. The syllabus changes from one semester to the next. You can find other versions of the syllabi at his faculty profile site.

MUJS 5440, Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies

Syllabus for Spring 2014.

MUJS 5450, Studies in Jazz History

Syllabus for Spring 2010.

MUJS 5780, Jazz Styles and Analysis

Syllabus for Fall 2013.

Improvisation

Improvisation courses overview

The prerequisites to Jazz Improvisation are MUJS 1360, 1361, 1370 and 1371.

Placement in an improvisation class is determined by an audition.

MUJS 2360, Jazz Improvisation
The first semester of improvisation.

MUJS 2370, Jazz Improvisation
The second semester of improvisation.

MUJS 3360, Advanced Jazz Improvisation
The third semester of improvisation.

MUJS 3370, Advanced Jazz Improvisation
The fourth semester of improvisation.

MUJS 5480, Pedagogy of Jazz
Graduate course with emphasis on the teaching of improvisation

MUJS 5490, Advanced Jazz Improvisation
Graduate improvisation

MUJS 2360, Jazz Improvisation I

Download the syllabus in PDF.

MUJS 2370, Jazz Improvisation II

Download the syllabus in PDF.

MUJS 3360, Jazz Improvisation III

Download the syllabus in PDF.

MUJS 3370, Jazz Improvisation IV

MUJS 3370
Advanced Improvisation

Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU #272
Phone: (940) 565-2229
Email:

Class Time: M/W 10:00-10:50AM in room 263 (spring) and T/TH 11:00-11:50AM in room 262 (fall)
Office Hours: TBA

Prerequisite: Successful completion (“B” or better) of MUJS 3360

Course Goal:
Learning tunes! I approach this class as if you were part of my own performing group. I expect that everyone will come well-prepared and ready to explore beyond what you typically do. In addition to paying respect to the true “aura” of each song, taking musical chances is an important part of the learning process (there are no wrong notes as long as we have developed enough skills to solve musical road blocks). Attention to the melody, rhythm, time feel, space, interaction with rhythm section, patience throughout the solo, poly-tonality and non-harmonic notes, will be encouraged (…it is ok to play an “A”-natural on an F minor chord as long as one learn to resolve it musically!)

Improvisor check-list:
Tone/personality
Melody/form
Harmonic depth/”tweaking”
Intervalic devices within the melody
Rhythmic devices within the melody
Articulation/phrasing/dynamics
Time feel
Interaction with rhythm section
Space
Motivic development
Rhythmic development/variety/sub-divisions
Repetition of ideas
Pacing throughout the solo (how many choruses should I take?, should I take another chorus?, did I reach my goal?, etc.)
Intuition
Quotes
Surprises
Taking chances

Grading:
• Final Playing Evaluation A= 25%, B=20%, C=15%, D=10%, F=0%
• Weekly Attendance/Preparation 0-5% for each class meeting (15x5%=75%)
• Final Grade: A=100-90%, B=89-80%, C=79-70%, D=69-60%, F=59% or below
(“B” or above is necessary in order to successfully pass this class. The class needs to be re-taken in case of a “C”)

Attendance Policy:
No unexcused absences are permitted.

Semester Outline and Schedule

Spring 2014 Tune List:
Cherokee
Inner Urge
Just In Time
Easy To Love
How Deep Is The Ocean
Joshua
Recordame
UMMG (Upper Manhattan Medical Group)
Yes and No
Moment’s Notice
Isfahan
Soul Eyes
I Fall In Love Too Easily
Falling Grace
Epistrophy
Alone Together
Jordu
Ceora
The Song Is You
Airegin

Each group must learn eight tunes by memory for a final performance at the end of the semester (see schedule below). For the final performance, each group will perform a 50-minute set where I will call five of the selected eight tunes . Styles must include a ballad, medium swing, up-tempo, “latin” feel, and odd-meter. Each group will get weekly feed-back on their selected tunes.

Monday or Tuesday Class:
Group A
Group B

Wednesday or Thursday Class:
Group C
Group D

Week 1: Lecture on tune preparation
Week 2: Lecture on harmony, rhythm, and leading tone melody
Week 3: Tune #1
Week 4: Tune #2
Week 5: Tune #3
Week 6: Tune #4
Week 7: Tune #5
Week 8: Tune #6
Week 9: Tune #7
Week 10: Tune #8
Week 11: Revisit selected tunes
Week 12: Revisit selected tunes
Week 13: Revisit selected tunes
Week 14: Group Performances
Week 15: Group performances
Week 16: FIPE Exams

MUJS 5480, Pedagogy of Jazz

Textbooks
"Teaching Jazz" by Jerry Coker, Rottenburg N., West Germany: Advance Music (available at Pender's Music).
"Selected Articles - MUJS 5480" by Mike Steinel
Course Objectives: At the completion of this course students will demonstrate an understanding of the basic materials, systems, and philosophies related to the teaching of jazz improvisation.
Course Content: The activities will include:
1. A review of materials (books, records, articles, dissertatia etc.) available for use in the teaching of jazz improvisation.
2. Teaching projects where each student will have the opportunity to instruct a small "lab" group.
3. Final Project:
a. Jazz Improvisation Syllabus (College Level - 2 Semesters)
b. Letter of application
c. Resume
d. Statement of teaching philosophy
1. General educational philosophy
2. Philosophy of Music Education
3. Philosophy of Jazz Education (Improvisation)
Assignments: All work is due at the beginning of class on the due date. Late work will be graded down one letter grade. Work that is more than a week late will not be accepted.
Supplemental Reading List: The following books will be used as supplemental readings. They will be placed on reserve in the library.
Aebersold, Jamey, A New Approach to Jazz Improvisation Vols 1 - 58, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
Baker, David, Jazz Pedagogy, Alfred Music
Baker, David, A New Approach To Ear Training, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures Publications.
Baker, David, How To Play Bebop (Three Volumes), Van Nuys, CA, Alfred Publishing Corporation.
Baker, David, Jazz Improvisation, Chicago, IL, Maher Publications.
Benward, Bruce, Jazz Improvisation, Dubuque, IA, Wm. C. Brown Publishers.
Berg, Shelton, Jazz Improvisation: The Goal Note Method, Denver, CO: Lou Fisher Music, 1989.
Berliner, Paul, Thinking In Jazz, Chicago, IL, University of Chicago Press, 1994.
Coker, Jerry, Elements of the Jazz Language, Miami, FL, CPP/Belwin.
Coker, Jerry, How To Practice Jazz, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
Coker, Jerry, Improvising Jazz, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall.
Coker, Jerry, Listening To Jazz, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall.
Coker, Jerry, The Jazz Idiom , Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall.
Crook, Hal, How To Improvise
Deutch, Maury, Improvisation Concepts and Jazz Patterns, New York, NY, Charles Colin Publications.
DeGreg, Phil, Jazz Keyboard Voicings and Harmony, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
Evans, Lee, Improvising by Learning How To Compose, Milwaukee, WI, Hal Leonard Publishing.
Greene, Barry , The Inner Game of Music, West Germany: Advance Music.
Haerle, Dan, Jazz Improvisation For Keyboard Players, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures.
Haerle, Dan, Jazz/Rock Voicings for the Contemporary Keyboard Player, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures.
Haerle, Dan, Scales for Improvisation, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures.
Haerle, Dan, The Jazz Language, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures.
Haerle, Dan, The Jazz Sound, Milwaukee, WI, Hal Leonard Publishing.
Haerle, Dan; Jack Peterson, and Rich Matteson, Jazz Tunes for Improvisation, Hialeah, FL, Columbia Pictures.
Harbison, Pat, Technical Studies for the Modern Trumpet, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
Jaffe, Andrew, Jazz Theory, Dubuque, IA, Wm C. Brown and Company.
Helmer, Jeff and Richard Lawn, Jazz, Theory and Practice Belmont, CA, Wadsworth Publishing Company.
Hunt, Joe, 52nd Street Beat, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
LaPorta, John, A Guide To Improvisation, Boston, MA, Berklee Press
Liebman, Dave, Lookout Farm, Hollywood, CA, Almo Publications.
Liebman, Dave, A Chromatic Approach to Jazz Harmony, Rottenburg N., West Germany: Advance Music.
Mehegan, John, Contemporary Piano Styles (Vols. 1-4), New York, NY, Watson Guptill Publishing.
Nachmanovitch, David, Free Play, New York, NY: GP Putnam's Sons, 1990.
Reeves, Scott D., Creative Jazz Improvisation, Englewod Cliffs, NJ, Prentice Hall.
Steinel, Mike, Building A Jazz Vocabulary, Milwaukee WI, Hal Leonard Pub., 1994.
Stravinsky, Igor, The Poetics of Music, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1947.
Weiskopf, Walt and Ramon Ricker, Coltrane, A Player's Guide To His Harmony, New Albany, Indiana, Jamey Aebersold.
Wollner, Gertrude, Improvising In Music, Garden City, NY, Doubleday and Co.
Zinn, David, The Structure and Analysis of the Modern Improvised Solo, New York, NY, Excelsior Music Publications.

MUJS 5490, Advanced Jazz Improvisation

MUJS 5490 Course Syllabus
Fred Hamilton
Office #277

www.fredhamilton.com

This is a graduate performance seminar with emphasis upon concepts to help each student in the performance and teaching of jazz. The focus will be on the essential parameters of the music: Time, Melody, Phrasing and Harmony. I expect every student to have melodies, changes and forms memorized prior to the first class scheduled for the particular composition. All compositions are available by numerous artists on the I Tunes store. If you download, get major artists and go to other sites and find the personnel on the recording.

The goals of the class are:
1) Find the mental or emotional "roadblocks" in students' creative improvisation and work toward minimizing them.
2) Work on developing students’ rhythmic vitality and sense of time.
3) Develop the student’s view of melody as an improvisational focus.
4) Improve harmonic skills through focus upon triads and paired triads.

I expect every student to have melodies and forms memorized prior to the first class scheduled for the particular composition. In the case of the standards, figure out a personal phrasing of the melody for the meter listed. All compositions are available from the iTunes store. There may not be recordings of the standards in the designated meter. If you download, go to other sites and try to find out the personnel on the recording. Smatter, More than Ever and a Little Blues for You are published in the European Real Book and are available as sheet music downloads for $1.95 at www.freehandmusic.com.

Repertoire to be studied:
Stella by Starlight
Solar
Milestones (bebop, not modal)
Have You Met Miss Jones (6/4 and 5/4)
Giant Steps
26/2
How Deep is the Ocean? (7/4)
Someday My Prince Will Come (5/4)
Eternal Triangle
Ballads to be chosen from the following:
What’s New, My Foolish Heart, You Don’t Know What Love Is, Peace, I Can’t Get Started, Polka Dots and Moonbeams, Darn that Dream, I Fall in Love Too Easily, Blame it on My Youth

Reference Materials (not required texts): Intervallic Improvisation, Walt Weiskopf; Coltrane: a Player’s Guide to His Harmony, Walt Weskopf & Ramon Ricker; Expansions, Gary Campbell

Grades: Students are required to write performance evaluations for their midterm and final. Attendance is a priority for this class. One absence will lower the semester grade to a B, two absences to a C and three absences is a fail. If accrued before the drop deadline, it is the student’s responsibility to drop the class. Two times being tardy (10- 15 minutes late) will count for an absence. Over 15 minutes late is an absence. The GIPE will count as a final jury for this class. If the GIPE is failed, the semester grade will be a C. If it is passed, then the attendance policy will determine the grade.

Performance Fundamentals classes

Performance Fundamentals classes cover the basics of jazz performance in sections for each instrument.

Jazz Performance Fundamentals II for Guitar

Instructor
Fred Hamilton
Office #277
Office Hours TBA
www.fredhamilton.com

Goals
To continue to put chord voicings to use in tunes. Work on improvisation by applying arpeggios, chord-scales and concepts. Learn more tunes, transcribe solos, and perform.

Suggested Recordings
Lush Life, John Coltrane
Concierto, Jim Hall
Live! Jim Hall
The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery
Bags Meets Wes, Riverside
Jimmy Raney Visits Paris Vol.1, Vogue
The Antonio Carlos Jobim Songbook, Verve
Question and Answer, Pat Metheny, Geffen

Repertoire to be studied:
I Hear a Rhapsody; George Fragos, Jack Baker, Dick Gasparre
I Love You; Cole Porter
You’ld Be So Nice to Come Home To; Cole Porter
Prelude to a Kiss; Duke Ellington
Quiet Nights of Quiet Stars (Corcovado); Antonio Carlos Jobim
Body and Soul
Like Someone in Love; Jimmy Van Heusen

Memorized Melodies
Straight, No Chaser
Scrapple from the Apple
Anthropology
Oleo
Billie’s Bounce

Technical Information to be Studied this Semester:
Melodic Harmonization of Standard Tunes
Chord Substitution, Intros, Endings and Tags
Harmonic Extensions and Alterations as Related to Melodic Harmonization Comping
Improvisation (chord scales, arpeggios, patterns and development)

Grades and Due Dates:
Melodies (20%)
Tests and Artist Paper (20%)
Performances (30%)
Transcriptions (30%)

Melodies must be played for your private teacher during the week of the listed dates, no exceptions.
Feb 2- Straight No Chaser
Feb 16- Scrapple
Feb. 23- Oleo
March 2 and 4 Transcription performances in class
March 9 and 11 Performances with rhythm section in class
March 25- Anthropology
April 15- Billie’s Bounce
April 20 and 22 Transcription performances
April 27 and 29 Performances with rhythm section

Transcriptions:
Two complete solos of major jazz artists. These will be performed with the recording during the Midterm week and the last week of class. Must be memorized and performed well to receive an A. Start early and consult your private teacher for help and advice.

Performances: At midterm and at final, one tune from required repertoire with rhythm section, demonstrating melodic harmonization, comping and improvisation. Bring an MP3 recorder and record your performance.

Attendance Policy
One absence allowed for this course. Two absences will lower the semester grade one letter. Three will lower it two letters and four or more constitute a failing grade. If three are accrued before the final drop deadline, the student is responsible to drop the class.

MUEN 2611, Jazz Trumpet Master Class

General Information
Course Objectives: At the completion of this course students will demonstrate an understanding of jazz trumpet performance.
Course Content: The activities will include:
1. An overview of basic technique related to tone production and breath control.
2. An overview of basic finger technique development.
3. Critiques of performances.
4. An overview of historical style periods of jazz trumpet performance.
Required Materials: None
Attendance Policy: Attendance is required at all sessions. Three unexcused absences will result in the reduction of the final grade. Excused absences should be cleared in advance (if possible) and students missing class will be responsible for assignments and homework. Repeated tardiness will result in the reduction of the final grade. BE ON TIME!
Criteria For Grading: There will be several projects and exams throughout the semester. They fall into three main categories:
1. Performance Evaluations
2. Transcription/Performance Projects
3. Tone and Technique Evaluations
The final grade will be an average of the grades for these three areas.

MUEN 2611, Rhythm Section Master Class

General Information
This class is team-taught by Fred Hamilton, Lynn Seaton, Stefan Karlsson, and Ed Soph and is designed to focus on specific topics that relate to the rhythm section in a small jazz group. Some of these are: group communication, individual instrument roles (piano and guitar comping techniques, bass lines, whether to "break it up", etc.), performance styles (ballads, medium tempo "tippin'" grooves, jazz waltz, up tempo burners, free playing, latin, etc.), and classic rhythm section analysis (early New Orleans, Basie, early bebop, post bop, Miles' ensembles of the '50s and '60s, Oscar Peterson, Wes Montgomery, etc.). There are four or five groups formed for the class (usually composed of piano, guitar, bass and drums) that rehearse and perform for critique and videotaping. Admission in the course is by consent of the instructors.
Goals
Develop stronger communication skills within the section
Work on a variety of forms, tempos and styles
Rehearse on a weekly basis with your assigned group and become a "band"
Grading System
Each group will perform three times during the semester for a grade and critique on assigned days (30%).
Each group will split a class period for a midterm performance (30%).
Each group will use an entire class period for a final performance (40%).
Attendance Policy
Three absences during the semester are allowed, all subsequent absences will reduce the semester grade by a half letter unless discussed with me. When your group is not designated to play, you are still expected to attend class.
Problems of excessive absence should be taken care of with the professors, or the class should be dropped prior to the final date.
Grades of Incomplete
Rhythm Section Masterclass must be completed during the semester enrolled.
Americans with Disabilities Act
The College of Music complies with the ADA in making reasonable accomodation for qualified students with disability. If you have an established disability as defined in the ADA and would like to request accommodation, please see the instructor as soon as possible.
Semester Outline
[Week]
[Class Period], [Subject Matter]
Week 1
1st Course Introduction
2nd On days when specific groups are not specified, everyone bring instruments and be ready to play.
Week 2
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 3
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 4
1st Performance Evaluation #1- Group 1 and 2, one med. groove
2nd Performance Evaluation #1- Group 3 and 4, same
Week 5
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 6
1st Performance Evaluation #2 - Group 4 and 1, one burner
2nd Performance Evaluation #2 - Group 3 and 2, same
Week 7
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 8
1st Midterm Performances- Group 3 and 4, (20 min., one latin and one up tempo burner, mm 280)
2nd Midterm Performances - Group 1 and 2, same
Week 9
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 10
1st Performance Evaluation #3 - Group 4 and 1 one ballad each)
2nd Performance Evaluation #3 - Group 4 and 1 one ballad each)
Week 11
1st Group playing
2nd Group playing
Week 12
1st Group playing
2nd Final Performance- Group 1 (40 min.), Allow time for instructor's comments at the end of the set.
Week 13
1st Final Performance- Group 2
2nd Final Performance- Group 3
Week 14
1st Final Performance- Group 4
2nd Free playing
Week 15
1st Free playing
2nd Free playing

MUJS 1131, Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Bass I

Lynn Seaton:
• Office - Music Building 279
• Phone - (940) 369-7639
• Jazz Studies office phone - (940) 565-3743
Course Objectives: To develop a basic knowledge of jazz bass playing by focusing on bass lines, scales,
arpeggios, and recordings.
• Ability to improvise bass lines from chord symbols
• Ability to play appropriate scales and arpeggios from chord symbols
• Start/continue to build a jazz repertoire
• Better reading skills
• Ability to play the modes of the major scale, blues, bebop, melodic minor and harmonic minor
scales up and down to the ninth in all 12 keys in at least one octave
• Arpeggiate chords to the ninth
• Two octave chromatic scale (or more)
• Listening and transcribing
• Start/continue knowledge of jazz bass history and the players
• Develop good practice skills
Attendance:
Attendance is required at all sessions. Three unexcused absences will result in a reduction of the final
grade. Excused absences must be cleared with me in advance and students missing class will be responsible
for assignments and homework. An unexcused absence on a day when you have something due will result
in an "F" for that assignment or test. Repeated tardiness will result in a reduction of the final grade.
Grading:
• Scale and Arpeggio Tests - 20%
• Transcriptions 25%
• Class Assignments 30%
• Assessments - Written and listening - 15%.
Playing Etude #4 from "Jazz Solos for Bass" from memory- 10 %
Materials:
1) Aebersold playalong CD's and books
• Volume 6, "Charlie Parker"
• Volume 21, "Gettin' It Together"
• Ron Carter's transcribed bass line book from Volume 6
2) "Jazz Solos for Bass" by Lynn Seaton (Kendor Press)
3) "Essential Styles for the Drummer and Bassist" by Houghton & Warrington
4) 10 stave staff paper
5) Blank Cassette
Dialogue: An important of learning is an open dialogue between the teacher and the student. Please feel
free to call me or stop me in the hall to discuss anything.
Americans With Disabilities Act: The College of Music complies with the Americans With Disabilities
Act in making reasonable accommodation for qualified students with disability. If you have an established
disability as defined in the Americans With Disabilities Act and would like to request accommodation,
please see me as soon as possible.
Scholastic Honesty Policy: Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course,
the removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the student's actions to the Office
of the Dean of Students and to the Office of the Dean of the College of Music.
Jazz Bass Fundamentals Course Outline
Subject to change due to class need, holidays, etc.
Note: Several of the assignments, scale tests, and transcriptions may take some time and practice. You
may want to start early in the semester on # 6, 7, 10, 11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25 and 28-29.
1. Introduction, Requirements, and Transcription Assignments
Explain Scale and Arpeggio Tests
The tests my be condensed to more than 1 scale and/or arpeggio per chorus.
SCALE ASSIGNMENT: BLUES ROOT TO 8 AND BACK TO ROOT-THEN ARPEGGIO
1.3.5.b7.#9.7.5.3.1 - Dom.7(#9) chord
SCALE AND ARPEGGIO ASSIGNMENT: DOMINANT 7TH (MIXOLYDIAN) and BEBOP
(Aebersold playalong Volume 21, track 13) ROOT TO 9 THEN Back TO 2-THEN ARPEGGIO
1,3,5,b7,9,7,5,3,1
2. Blues: Walking bass lines - lower chromatic approach tones
TUNE ASSIGNMENT: Now's the Time
ETUDE ASSIGNMENT: Ron Carter's bass line on F blues
(Aebersold playalong, Volume 6, track 1)
3. Blues: Upper Chromatic Approach Tones
ASSIGNMENT: WRITE 2 CHORUSES OF F BLUES BASS LINE
4. Blues:
PLAY written and improvised bass lines on F blues
ETUDE ASSIGNMENT: # 3 in "Jazz Solos for Bass"
5. SCALE AND ARPEGGIO TEST:
BEBOP, MIXOLYDIAN AND BLUES VOLUME 21 TRACK 13.
6. Blues: PLAY and analyze Ron Carter's bass line from Now's the Time
SCALE AND ARPEGGIO ASSIGNMENT: MAJOR and LYDIAN, VOLUME 21 TRACK 1
SCALE ASSIGNMENT: CHROMATIC-FROM THE LOWEST NOTE AVAILABLE TO THE Bb
ABOVE THE G OCTAVE (12th fret) MM=160 OR ABOVE
7. Blues: Alternate changes
ASSIGNMENT: WRITE 2 CHORUSES OF Bb BLUES AND PLAY WITH VOLUME 21, DISC 2,
TRACK 15
8. Blues: PLAY written and improvised bass lines on Bb blues with VOLUME 21 TRACK 15
9. PLAY Etude # 3
SCALE AND ARPEGGIO ASSIGNMENT: VOLUME 21 - DORIAN, PHRYGIAN and AEOLIAN,
TRACK 18; LOCRIAN, TRACK 28. MELODIC AND HARMONIC MINOR Track 29
10. SCALE AND ARPEGGIO TEST:
MAJOR and LYDIAN, VOLUME 21 TRACK 1
CHROMATIC-FROM THE LOWEST NOTE AVAILABLE TO THE Bb ABOVE THE G OCTAVE
(12th fret) in 1/8 notes MM=100 OR ABOVE
11. TUNE: Autumn Leaves- Bb- Analyze
ASSIGNMENT: WRITE 1 CHORUS OF BASS LINE and TRANSCRIBE BASSLINE
12. TRANSCRIPTION DUE: AUTUMN LEAVES
PLAY written, and transcribed bass lines - Autumn Leaves
13. SCALE AND ARPEGGIO TEST:
LOCRIAN, TRACK 28. MELODIC AND HARMONIC MINOR TRACK 29
14. TUNE: All The Things You Are-Ab-Analyze
ASSIGNMENT TRANSCRIBE BASSLINE
ETUDE ASSIGNMENT: # 2 in "Jazz Solos for Bass"
15. TRANSCRIPTION DUE: ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE
PLAY transcribed and improvised bass lines - All The Things You Are
16. SCALE AND ARPEGGIO TEST:
VOLUME 21 - DORIAN, PHRYGIAN, AEOLIAN, TRACK 18
17. PLAY ETUDE #2 in " Jazz Solos for Bass"
18. Bossa Nova Samba- Styles book
19. Mambo - Styles book
ETUDE ASSIGNMENT: # 4 in "Jazz Solos for Bass"
20. Rhythm Changes - TUNE: Lester Leaps In-Bb
ETUDE ASSIGNMENT: Ron Carter's bass line on Thriving From A Riff
(Aebersold playalong, Volume 6)
ASSIGNMENT: TRANSCRIBE BASSLINE
21. TRANSCRIPTION DUE: RHYTHM CHANGES - PLAY transcribed and improvised bass lines -
Rhythm Changes
22. PLAY Ron Carter's "Thriving From a Riff" bass line.
23. Review
24. Written Assessments and PLAY Etude # 4 in " Jazz Solos for Bass" from memory
25. Listening Assessments and PLAY Etude # 4 in " Jazz Solos for Bass" from memory
26. PLAY Tunes from memory: Blues and/or Autumn Leaves and/or All the Things You Are and/or
Rhythm Changes.
27. PLAY Tunes from memory: Blues and/or Autumn Leaves and/or All the Things You Are and/or
Rhythm Changes.
28. PLAY Tunes from memory: Blues and/or Autumn Leaves and/or All the Things You Are and/or
Rhythm Changes.
Note: If not all bassists finish playing #4 in the class, we will use the assigned time during finals week to
hear the rest.

MUJS 1131, Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Guitar I

MUJS 1131.501 Course Syllabus
Fred Hamilton
Office # 277
www.fredhamilton.com

Required Textbooks:

Chords Galore, Jack Petersen, pub. Mel Bay
Melodic Studies & Compositions for Guitar, Fred Hamilton pub. Mel Bay
Jazz Guitar Standards Volume 1, pub. Mel Bay
Modern Chords, Advanced Harmony for Guitar, Vic Juris, pub. Mel Bay

The books are available locally at The UNT Bookstore. If sold out, they may be ordered from www.melbay.com

Required Course materials:
Metronome for practice; bring your guitar to all classes;
Small notebook or staff notebook; I recommend Moleskin brand available at the
Bookstore (small and can fit in your case)

Class Goals:
1. Improve technique, develop practice discipline
2. Learn systematic voicing principles
3. Apply those voicings to repertoire (comping, melodic harmonization, improvisation)
4. Improve reading skills and overall knowledge of the guitar fret board
5. Become better acquainted with jazz style and tradition

Attendance policy:
I will take roll. One absence allowed for this course. Two absences will lower the semester grade one letter. Three will constitute a failing grade. If three are accrued before the final drop deadline, the student is responsible to drop the class.

Grades:
Tests and Artist Paper 50%
Midterm (transcription) 25%
Final (chord solo) 25%

MUJS 1131, Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Piano I

MUJS 1131
Jazz Piano Master Class I
Class Room #121
Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU #272
Phone: 565-2229
Email:

Instructor: Teaching Assistant- TBA
RequiredTextbook: Jazz Piano Voicing Skills (by, Dan Haerle)
Course Description/Prerequisite:
Advanced work with jazz harmony in a keyboard lab situation. The emphasis is
on developing the ability to perform a number of commonly used progressions
in the jazz idiom (refer to the text regarding specific progressions.) For the
purpose of application, seven songs from the standard jazz repertoire are
included. The course is primarily designed for jazz piano majors. However,
anyone who can demonstrate adequate proficiency (either by successful completion of MUJS
1371 or by an in-person consultation/audition with Professor Stefan Karlsson) may participate in the course.
Course Content:
Skill Tests- (Pass or Fail)
• Memorized
• Two trials
• In a given tempo (quarter-note=120)
Tune Tests- (grade A-D)
• May read chord changes
• Two trials
• In a given tempo
• Three tunes: L.H moving bass line with R.H shell-voicings
(accompanying style)
• Three tunes: R.H melody with L.H non-root shell-voicings (melody style)
• One tune: solo piano style
Grading:
• Skills - 3%each x 20 skills = 60%
• Tunes - 5%each X 6 tune + 10% for solo piece = 40%
Attendance:
Two unexcused absences are permitted, however beyond the 2nd unexcused
absence, each absence will lower your final semester grade by one
letter grade. Excused absences must be cleared in advance in person.
Semester Schedule
Tuesday Thursday
Week 1 Introduction Lecture: Skill 48-50
Week 2 Test: Skill 48-50 Lecture: Tune 1
Week 3 Test: Confirmation Lecture: Skill 51-52
Week 4 Test: Skill 51-52 Lecture: Tune 2
Week 5 Test: Along Came Betty Lecture: Skill 53-54
Week 6 Test: Skill 53-54 Lecture: Tune 3
Week 7 Test: Oleo Lecture: Skill 55-56
Week 8 Test: Skill 55-56 Lecture: Tune 4
Week 9 Test: Stablemates Lecture: Skill 57-60
Week 10 Test: Skill 57-60 Lecture: Tune 5
Week 11 Test: Giant Steps Lecture: Skill 117
Week 12 Test: Skill 117 Lecture: Tune 6
Week 13 Test: Moments Notice Lecture: Skill 118-123
Week 14 Test: Skill 118-123 Lecture: Tune 7
Week 15 Test: Come Rain or Come Shine Make-up test(s)
Compliance with Federal Statutes
The College of Music complies with, "The Americans With Disabilities Act", in
making reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disability. If you
have an established disability as defined in this act and would like to request
accommodations, please see me as soon as possible.
Scholastic Honesty Policy
Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course, the
removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the
student's actions to the office of the Dean of Students and to the office of the
Dean of College of Music.

MUJS 1131-32 Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Voice

For information on the two semester sequence in vocal jazz fundamentals,
go here.

MUJS 1132, Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Bass II

Lynn Seaton - Office # - 279 Phone # - UNT- 940 - 369-7639 Home- 972-317-3338

An important part of learning is an open dialogue between teacher and student. Talk to me any time about anything - on the phone, in the hall, or see me in my office.

Attendance Policy: Attendance is required at all sessions. If you can't be in class, call me or tell me in advance when possible. Please call me if you are sick. Three unexcused absences will result in the reduction
of the final grade. Excused absences should be cleared in advance (if possible) and students missing class will be responsible for assignments and homework. Repeated tardiness will result in the reduction of
the final grade. BE ON TIME!

Compliance with Federal Statutes: The College of Music complies with the Americans with Disabilities
Act in making reasonable accommodation for qualified students with disability. If you have an established
disability as defined in the Americans with Disabilities Act and would like to request accommodation,
please see me as soon as possible. My office number is shown on this syllabus.
Scholastic Honesty Policy: Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course,
the removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the student's actions to the Office
of the Dean of Students and to the Office of the Dean of the College of Music.
Class Goals:
This class is designed to give the student an historical foundation of jazz bass styles through the study of
classic recordings. Students will be encouraged to play along in the style of the tunes played and
transcribe parts of the recordings to learn from the masters. This will foster an ability to hear chord
changes and play different styles. Harmonic knowledge and dexterity will be gained by studying the
scales and arpeggios found in the chords of the songs.
Required Materials:
1. The "Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz"
2. 10 stave manuscript paper
Optional Materials
1. A collection of solo transcriptions containing tunes on the "Smithsonian Collection of Classic Jazz"
such as Scott Reeves "Creative Jazz Improvisation", David Joyner "Anthology of Jazz History", "The
Charlie Parker Omnibook", etc.
Grading: assignments-50%, scale tests-20%, final assessment-15%, and final project-15%.
Final Project: A final project will be due on class day 25. It is a complete walking bassline transcription
of any standard from any Oscar Peterson recording with Ray Brown on bass.
Your grade will be mostly how well you play this transcription with the recording. If there is a bass
solo on the recording, it would be good to transcribe it also, but you may improvise your own during that
solo. The solo section of the transcription will not be graded.
Please bring a tape or CD, your written transcription, and a photocopy and cassette or CD copy of it
for me to grade. Play the nuances of the record!
You are also required to play a two-octave scale and arpeggio in the key of the tune.
Note : Some of the assignments will require practice. Please consider starting at the beginning of the
semester with the final project, # 12, 14, 18, 23, 24, 25
Course Outline: Subject to change for class need, holidays, etc.
1. Introduction
2. Analyze Louis Armstrong - "Struttin with some BBQ", transcribe the piano bassline as a class,
and play along with the recording.
3. Slap bass techniques, analyze and play two octave scales and arpeggios of Jelly Roll Morton -
"Grandpa"s Spells" as a class, and compare chord changes to other tunes.
4. Transcription Due: John Lindsay's slap bassline on the A section D.S. before the C section from
Jelly Roll Morton- " Grandpa's Spells " and play tune along with the recording.
5. Test- "Grandpa's Spells" two octave scales and arpeggios.
6. Bassline Due: Write and play a chorus in the style of Pops Foster's bassline from Sidney Bechet-
"Blue Horizon" and improvise another chorus in that style.
7. Analyze and play two octave scales and arpeggios of Benny Moten-"Moten Swing" as a class.
8. Transcription Due: Sketch routine (Note number of choruses in each key), transcribe Walter
Page's last chorus in Ab from Benny Moten -"Moten Swing", and play arrangement with record.
9. Test- "Moten Swing" two octave scales and arpeggios.
10. Transcription Due: Jimmy Blanton's bassline bar 21-44 from Duke Ellington "Ko-Ko" and play
whole chart with record.
11. Play along with Duke Ellington's "Cottontail" (Improvise a walking bass line on Rhythm changes
from memory. Note pedal points)
12. Play Slam Stewart's solo on "I Got Rhythm" with the recording and walk an improvised bassline
with Don Byas. (Note alternate changes)
13. Analyze and play two octave scales and arpeggios as a class from Coleman Hawkins- "Man I
Love"
14. Transcription Due: Coleman Hawkins-"Man I Love" the two A sections of Oscar Pettiford's
walking bassline before his solo and play this and his solo with record.
15. Test- "Man I Love" two octave scales and arpeggios.
16. Play "Cherokee" melody from memory and improvise a walking bassline from memorized chord
changes along with Charlie Parker's "Koko" (A tune based on these changes. Start melody after the
intro.)
17. Analyze Monk's "Criss Cross" for pentatonic scales as a class.
18. Transcription Due: Play Milt Jackson's solo and then transcribe Al McKibbon's walking bassline
from the third chorus (Sahib & Monk's solo) from "Criss Cross" and play with record.
19. Test- Pentatonic scales from Monk's "Criss Cross' two octave.
20. Transcription Due: First (melody) chorus of Teddy Kotick's bassline from Horace Silver-"Moon
Rays" and walk an improvised bassline with the record. Circle the enclosures (notes above and below
the target note- chromatic or scalar) that lead to the next chord.
21. Play free ala Mingus' intro to "Haitian Fight Song" and improvise solos and walking basslines on
G- blues (Changes Memorized).
22. Transcription Due: Mingus' bassline from when he starts the walking pattern through the quarter
note triplets on 12 bars later on "Haitian Fight Song", Sketch routine of record out ( sequence of stop time,
double time etc.) and play with record.
23. Test: Two Octave Half Whole Diminished and Super Locrian Scales and b9 Arpeggios with
Volume 21 track #14 (#14 in book)
24. Transcription Due: Play bass part of melody, Miles' solo, then transcribe and play Paul Chamber's
bassline on Coltrane's first chorus with the record of " So What".
25 Review
26. . Written assessments.
27. Listening skills assesment
28. Transcription Due: It is a complete walking bassline transcription of any standard from any
Oscar Peterson recording with Ray Brown on bass. Part of the final assessment will be playing this
transcription with the recording. If there is a bass solo on the recording, it would be good to
transcribe it also, but you may improvise your own during that solo.
29. More Ray Brown
Note: If time runs out for the playing of the transcriptions, we will use the time allotted during finals week.

MUJS 1132, Jazz Performance Fundamentals for Piano II

MUJS 1132
Jazz Piano Performance Fundamental II
Instructor: TF (TBA)
Major Professor: Stefan Karlsson
Office: MU #272
Phone: 565-2229
Email:

Class Time: TU/TH 3:00-3:50PM in room #292

Prerequisite: Successful completion of MUJS 1371 & MUJS 1131 or by consent of instructor

Course Content:
MUJS 1132 will cover the following topics:
• The evolution of jazz piano and its innovators
• Orchestration (continuation of orchestration devices: shell-voicings, block chords, drop-2, “So What”, modal/quartal voicings, and poly-chords)
• Chord substitutions
• Comping techniques (including various transcription assignments)
• Piano trio arranging and performance

Suggested Texts:
• AEBERSOLD VOL. 55/ TRANSCRIBED PIANO COMPING (HAL GALPER)

Grading:
• Weekly Assignments- P/F (failure to pass all assignments will result in an automatic “C” in the class)
• Five Comping transcriptions- 15% x 5= 75%
• Listening test- 10%
• Trio performance- 15% (Final Exam)

Attendance Policy:
Two unexcused absences are permitted, however beyond the 2nd unexcused absence, each absence will lower your final semester grade by one letter grade. Excused absences must be cleared in advance.

SEMESTER SCHEDULE:
Week 1: Introduction week and lecture on comping techniques
Week 2: Comping transcription exam #1 (from Aebersold Vol. 55- Hal Galper's comping)
Week 3: Comping transcription exam #2 (from Aebersold Vol. 55- Hal Galper's comping)
Week 4: Comping transcription exam #3 (transcribed by the student)
Week 5: Comping transcription exam #4 (transcribed by the student)
Week 6: Comping transcription exam #5 (transcribed by the student)
Week 7-8: Jazz piano innovators (listening)
Week 9: Lecture on piano trio playing including trio arranging techniques
Week 10-13: Trio Playing
Week 14: Listening Test
Week 15: Final Exam – Trio performances

Compliance with Federal Statues: The College of Music complies with, "The American's With Disabilities Act", in making reasonable accommodations for qualified students with disability. If you have an established disability as defied in this act and would like to request accommodations, please see me as soon as possible.

Scholastic Honesty Policy: Cheating, in any form, will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course, the removal of the student from the course, and immediate reporting of the student's actions to the office of the Dean of Students and to the office of the Dean of College of Music.

MUJS 3150, Advanced Jazz Piano Master Class

Text - "The New Real Book," Sher Music Co. This book has been chosen to give you an extensive resource for learning tunes. It also ensures that you will have the music to whatever anyone in class is playing.
Performance - Everyone will perform in class on a rotating basis, that is, no one will play a second time until everyone has performed. Everyone will play as many times as possible. Tunes performed will be from a "core" list of tunes, selected from The New Real Book, and must be by memory. Copies of the tune must be supplied to the rhythm section.
Attendance - No unexcused absences will be allowed. Requests for excused absences must be submitted in writing, in advance.
Final Exam - The final exam will consist of a final performance which will be videotaped for self-evaluation. This should be a polished performance which involves a setting of the tune which is well thought out and executed. Normally, the tune performed should probably be one of the "core" group which has been worked on during the semester but must be from The New Real Book, regardless.
Americans With Disabilities Act: The College of Music complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act in making reasonable accommodation for qualified students with disability. If you have an established disability as defined in the Americans With Disabilities Act and would like to request accommodation, please see me as soon as possible.
Transcribed Solo - Everyone will do a transcription of a jazz piano solo and present it to the class. The presentation will include discussing interesting aspects of the solo and performing it with the recording. A final copy of the solo must be copied neatly in order to reproduce it for the whole class. This final copy should be:
1) Copied on 8 1/2 by 11, 10 stave music pad manuscript.
2) Copied with #2 pencil, black felt tip pen, or black ink pen.
3) Spaced out to be legible without wasting paper. In other words, don't have a page with only two or three measures on it.
4) Option: The final copy may be prepared with music notation software and printed on 8 1/2 by 11 paper.
The final copy of the solo will be due at mid-term.

Proficiency Exams

See the link under "Current" on the main page of this site for the current schedule of proficiency exams.

Advanced Placement and Credit by Examination

A maximum of 24 semester hours of credit earned at this institution or elsewhere may be applied toward the bachelor's degree. A maximum of 36 credit hours for all non-traditional forms of education may be counted toward fulfilling undergraduate degree requirements. Such credit is not included in determining grade point averages and has certain restrictions (see the UNT undergraduate catalog.
Freshmen, transfer students and graduate students with undergraduate deficiencies must either take or test out of all core jazz courses. University policy prohibits testing out of a course which has already been taken for credit. If a student doesn't a grade of A or B (required in all core jazz courses), he or she must retake the course in question to raise the grade. Specific information concerning these exams may be found below.

Aural Skills Proficiency (also serves as MUJS 1361 Barrier Exam)

The Aural Skills Proficiency covers:
intervals within the octave
7th chords played in typical jazz voicings
Short melodies based on modes of the major scale
Major and minor blues scale melodies
Pentatonic scale melodies
Chord progressions
Modulations from one major key to another
Rhythmic transcription
Melodic transcription

Final Improvisation Proficiency Exam (FIPE)

Instrumental
All instrumental jazz performance majors must pass the Final Improvisation Proficiency Exam (FIPE) before they will be allowed to play a senior recital.
The exam will take place each semester during finals week and be adjudicated by no fewer than five members of the jazz faculty. Each student must demonstrate competency in the art of jazz improvisation on repertoire drawn from the UNT course of study in jazz improvisation. (MUJS 2360, 2370, 3360, 3370)
It is recommended but not required that students take the FIPE at the end of the semester in which they are enrolled in MUJS 3370. A student may attempt the FIPE one time without being enrolled in MUJS 3370, after which he/she must enroll in 3370 before attempting the FIPE again.
Students are expected to perform their senior recital in the semester following successful completion of the FIPE. If the recital is not completed within one year the student will be required to retake the FIPE.

Vocal
The Exit Examination in MUJS 4120 Vocal Jazz Styles serves as the FIPE for vocalists.

Improvisation Continuation Exam (ICE)

All undergraduate jazz majors must pass the Improvisation Continuation Exam (ICE) before they will be admitted to MUJS 3360 (Advanced Jazz Improvisation), MUJS 4610 (Advanced Jazz Arranging), or MUJS 4120 (Vocal Jazz Styles). The exam will take place each semester during finals week and be adjudicated by no fewer than five members of the jazz faculty. Each student must demonstrate competency in the art of jazz improvisation on repertoire drawn from the UNT course of study in jazz improvisation. (MUJS 2360 and 2370).

It is recommended but not required that students take the ICE at the end of the semester in which they are enrolled in MUJS 2370. A student may attempt the ICE one time without being enrolled in MUJS 2370, after which he/she must enroll in 2370 before attempting the ICE again.

Jazz Arranging Proficiency Exams

Jazz Arranging Proficiency Examinations

Three examinations are required in Jazz Arranging for before a student can move to a higher level in jazz arranging and composing. All three exams are offered during Finals Week (both long semesters) and in the week before the beginning of fall semester. Signup lists are posted outside MU348 weeks in advance of these exams.

The Jazz Arranging Continuation Exam is required for entry into either MUJS 4610 (third semester jazz arranging) or into MUJS 5760 (graduate jazz arranging). The ACE is described below.

The Jazz Arranging Proficiency Exam must be passed before a student can pursue a Senior Jazz Arranging Recital. The APE is described below.

The Graduate Arranging Proficiency Exam must be passed before a student can pursue a Graduate Jazz Arranging Recital. This exam is also described below.

The Jazz Arranging Continuation Exam (ACE) has three parts:

1. A written exam will measure the applicant's understanding of jazz harmony, jazz voicings and terminology, as well as the applicant's ability to score two short exercises – one for saxes and one for scoring the brass section, all according to UNT Jazz guidelines. (The grade of "A" in both MUJS 3610 and MUJS 3620 will substitute for this portion of the ACE.)

2. Following the written exam, a short keyboard exam will measure the effective use of piano voicings found in the document "Arranger's Piano," described online. The applicant will be given a lead sheet with eight bars of changes, to be played (in or out of tempo) with voicings described in the above document.

3. Following the keyboard exam, the third segment is experiential, focused on scores and live recordings of two recent jazz arrangements, one for small ensemble, one for large ensemble (big band). Scores must be complete and accurate, printed from computer notation, and containing effective, idiomatic treatment of the two ensembles represented. Representative styles for the small group are heard on recordings by Michael Brecker, Chris Potter, Pat Metheny, and Jazz Messengers. Representative treatment of the big band is found on scores and recordings found in the published volume Inside The Score, by Rayburn Wright.

Before attempting the ACE, you may access study guides online:

ACE Review 1 - Harmonizing Devices
ACE Review 2 - Melodic Developers
ACE Review 3 - Saxes and Density
ACE Review 4 - Scoring Brass
ACE Review 5 - Arrangers Piano

II. The Jazz Arranging Proficiency Exam (APE) must be passed before a student is allowed to participate in or schedule a Senior Jazz Arranging Recital. The exam is adjudicated by three members of the jazz faculty on a pass/fail basis, and must take place before the week of final exams.
Two recent scores for large jazz ensemble must be submitted that clearly demonstrate the ability to compose and arrange both musically and accurately in the jazz style. Scores and parts must be submitted along with the CD; the scores must be printed double-sided, and spiral bound. Scores must be accompanied by high quality live recordings submitted on CD, formatted to play on an ordinary player. Individual parts must be those read in performance.
It is highly recommended that this exam take place at the end of the semester the student is enrolled in MUJS 4610. All material submitted must be written and performed at this University. If unsuccessful, the student may resubmit once for reconsideration with new materials, in the week prior to the next long semester.

III. The Graduate Jazz Composition Proficiency Exam must be passed before a student is allowed to present a Graduate Jazz Composition Recital. The exam is adjudicated by three members of the jazz faculty on a pass/fail basis, and must take place at the end of the semester that precedes the graduate recital.

Four scores must be submitted, completed within a two-year period, that clearly demonstrate the ability to compose music idiomatically for both large and small jazz ensembles. The scores must reveal successful pursuit of melodic and harmonic techniques, jazz orchestration and notation according to North Texas standards. Additionally, the music must be interesting.

Of the four scores, two must be for large ensemble (one ballad, one with tempo), one for small group, one for yet a different ensemble. The compositions must be recorded in live performance, with high quality recordings submitted on one CD which has been formatted to play on an ordinary player. Scores must be printed double-sided, transposed, and grouped together in a spiral binder with an appropriate header.

Note: University policy prohibits testing out of a course which has already been taken for credit.

Jazz Fundamentals Proficiency Exams

MUJS 1360 Proficiency Exam
A true/false and multiple choice exam covering chapters 1 through 7 of "The Jazz Language" by Dan Haerle which is the text for the course.

MUJS 1370 Proficiency Exam
A true/false and multiple choice exam covering chapters 7 through 14 of "The Jazz Language" by Dan Haerle which is the text for the course.

University policy prohibits attempting to test out of a course already taken for credit.
The exam schedule is posted during the week before the start of classes.

Jazz Keyboard Proficiency

The Jazz Keyboard Proficiency Exam (JKPE) consists of the realization of a chord progression using idiomatic voicings, in tempo, at sight (from chord symbols only). A study packet of practice progressions is available in the Jazz Studies office for those individuals who want an indication of the difficulty of the exam before attempting to test out. You can download it here: keyboard study packet (PDF).
The study packet has progressions that are comparable to the JKPE but in two versions:
Chord symbols and voicings written out which show the proper kind of voice-leading and connection.
Chord symbols only as they appear in the JKPE.
Students will have a timed period to look over the exam before they attempt it. The JKPE is given at the beginning of each long semester. Simply sign up for an audition time (MU #272) or make a special appointment .

MUJS 1470 and MUJS 4470 Proficiency Exams

The MUJS 1470 Proficiency Test is an overview of the present content of the course. Contact Jay Saunders at (940) 369-8691 for more information.

The MUJS 4470 Proficiency Exam allows students to get credit for MUJS 4470, History of Jazz. The exam is described here. This exam is typically taken by graduate students who need to test out of MUJS 4470, which is a prerequisite for MUJS 5440, Introduction to Research in Jazz Studies, and MUJS 5450, Studies in Jazz History. Contact John Murphy for more information.

Special Problems Courses

MUJS 4900-4910, 5900-5910, Special Problems

These courses are arranged with professors and may consist of:
Individual projects in writing or performance
Group projects in performance
Special seminars to pursue a particular topic.

An example of a special problems course:
MUJS 4910, Special Studies in Tune Writing. (elective credit)
General Information
Textbook: None. Resources include tunes written and recorded by jazz artists, from the record libraries of the instructor and the students involved.
Prerequisite: MUJS 3610 and permission of the instructor.
Grading: Determined from participation, and two major projects, performed and recorded.
Content: This "special problems" course provides a one-semester (repeatable) experience in writing coherent tunes in the jazz idiom. Each student will write a new tune each week, updating and refining the output throughout the semester. Two of the tunes are identified as projects to be arranged and recorded according to the students' interests and access to players and facilities.

Vocal Jazz

Jazz Voice Studies at the University of North Texas

For information on Jazz Voice Auditions for admission to a degree program, see the Jazz Voice Auditions page.

Find UNT Vocal Jazz on social media:
https://www.facebook.com/UNTVocalJazz
Instagram: untvocaljazz
Twitter: untvocaljazz

Degrees: Jazz Vocal Performance is a degree path at the Bachelors, Masters, and Doctoral (DMA) levels. Within the undergraduate and graduate degree programs, students are involved in private applied lessons, small ensemble performing and recording experiences, recitals, vocal jazz forum, and vocal jazz ensembles.

Program of Study
In both the Bachelor and Master of Music Jazz Studies degrees, singers study and experience both the traditions and modern practices of vocal jazz performance (in both solo and ensemble settings), songwriting, vocal pedagogy, jazz aural and keyboard skills, jazz theory and arranging, as well as courses in jazz history. In addition to jazz courses and ensembles, undergraduates must satisfy College of Music and University Core requirements.

Ensembles
Participation in one of the four vocal jazz ensembles (UNT Jazz Singers, Avenue C, Third Street and West End) is open to any UNT student (regardless of major), on the basis of live auditions, held at the beginning of each semester. For more information visit the UNT Jazz Singers auditions page.
Vocal jazz majors are expected to participate in a jazz ensemble every semester.

UNT Jazz Singers Fall 2012

Applied Lessons
• Undergraduate vocal jazz students study jazz voice with one of the outstanding Graduate Teaching Fellows during their first four semesters of applied study. Following a successful Upper Division Examination (UDE), students study with one of the senior faculty (Jennifer Barnes, Rosana Eckert or Brian Piper). The senior recital occurs in the 8th semester.
• Graduate students pursuing the Master of Music in Jazz Studies have four semesters of vocal jazz applied study. The graduate recital occurs in the fourth semester.

Courses
For a listing and description of courses offered in vocal jazz and related subjects, see the Jazz Studies courses page.

Vocal Jazz Forum
Vocal Jazz Forum takes place each Friday afternoon at 3 PM in Lab East (Room 263) in the fall and spring semesters, featuring two or three students with instrumental accompaniment sharing the 50-minute performance, as well as specialized topics of interest. All vocal jazz majors are expected to be in attendance.

Vocal Jazz Recitals
The senior recital occurs in the last semester of study, and is shared by two student performers. Before presenting a senior recital, the student must first pass the Final Improvisation Proficiency Examination (FIPE), scheduled at the end of MUJS 4120, Vocal Jazz Styles. The senior recital may be given only in Fall or Spring semester; recital procedures and requirements are available in the Office of Jazz Studies.

The graduate recital is given by one singer, and occurs in the last Fall or Spring semester of study. Prior to the graduate vocal jazz recital, the student must earn an A or B in MUJS 4120, Vocal Jazz Styles, or test out of the course. Before being approved to present a graduate recital the singer must pass the Graduate Improvisation Proficiency Exam (GIPE).

For Further Information:
Contact Jennifer Barnes (email) and Rosana Eckert (email) for information regarding vocal jazz at UNT.
• For vocal jazz ensemble information visit here.
• For UNT Vocal Jazz Summer Workshop (held each June at UNT) information visit here.
• For Jennifer Barnes' bio and a link to her current teaching schedule, including available office hours, visit here.

MUJS 1131-32 Fundamentals of Jazz Performance (Voice)

MUJS 1131.507 (Fall) (1 cr) • Mon/Wed 2:00–2:50 PM Room 292
MUJS 1132.507 (Spring) (1 cr) • Mon/Wed 2:00–2:50 PM Room 292

Fundamentals of Vocal Jazz Performance is an introductory course focusing on the essential elements required of a jazz singer, and of a vocalist in the Jazz Studies program at North Texas. These include:
• Studying the major historical figures in solo and ensemble jazz singing and developing a thorough aural understanding of the evolution of the art form of jazz singing
• Jazz repertoire and interpretation
• Computer music notation skills (using Finale)
• Aural transcriptions of vocal & instrumental improvised solos
• Time management skill development
• Communication skill development
• Learning efficient and effective individual practice habits
• Transcribing songs through focusing on a "bottom-up" approach (bass lines, then chord qualities)

MUJS 1132.507 is a continuation of 1131, taught in the spring semester. Students will continue developing broad-based musicianship skills through activities including, but not limited to:
• Singing chords, scales and modes
• Singing “enclosures” and melodic patterns that comprise the jazz language
• Aural comprehension of basic chord progressions and how "hear" chord changes for the purpose of improvising melodically with and without lyrics

MUJS 3120, Vocal Jazz Techniques

Prerequisites: MUJS 1132.507 (Vocal Jazz Fundamentals), MUJS 1360, 1361, 1370, 1371 (Jazz Fundamentals), one semester each of Music Theory, and MUJS 1470.
Corequisite: MULB 1820 Jazz Singers (any of the four sections)
Grading: Determined by participation, repertoire development, and end of semester jury performance.
Repeatable for credit, contingent upon a minimum grade of B.
Content: Vocal Jazz Techniques addresses the basic stylistic requirements for solo singing in the jazz/popular idiom.

Course Topics include:
• Analysis of established singers and styles
• Vocal production for jazz singing
• Microphone technique
• Lyric interpretation
• Repertoire development
• Arranging for a trio rhythm section

Students must demonstrate the ability to sing in popular styles to be admitted into this course. Entrance evaluations will consist of students singing two prepared pieces in jazz/popular styles. Students are also required to provide an accompanist, or recorded accompaniment for the entrance evaluation.

MUJS 4120, Vocal Jazz Styles

Prerequisite: Two semesters of Vocal Jazz Techniques, minimum grade of "B", the College of Music Upper Division Exam (vocal proficiency), and the Jazz Studies Improvisation Continuation Exam (ICE).
Co-requisite: Jazz Singers I (no exceptions)
Meetings: Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 - 11:50 AM Room 348.
Attendance: Students are allowed 2 absences per semester.
Grading:
Weekly Assignments - 50%
Preparation and Presentation of Gig Book - 25%
Final Recordings and Arrangements - 25%

Course Objectives: Vocal Jazz Styles is the final class experience for the vocal jazz program, and is taken in the semester preceding the senior recital. The course emphasizes the three sections of the Final Vocal Jazz Exit Examination which include:
1. Performance and improvisation in three styles of vocal jazz:
• Swing tunes and blues including blues-oriented improvisation
• Straight-eighth and Latin tunes, including lyric/melodic improvisation
• Ballads including lyric improvisation.
2. Jazz Piano skills. Students will learn to accompany themselves.
3. Arranging. Students will arrange each song for jazz trio, with at least one song featuring one/two horns. Arrangements must contain appropriate harmonic changes and reveal the benefits gained from strategically chosen transcriptions. All lead sheets and arrangements will be notated and printed using Finale.

The course also addresses basic sound reinforcement and recording techniques.

MUJS 4630, Vocal Jazz Arranging

Prerequisite: MUJS 3610, minimum grade of B.
Grading: Determined by assignment grades, attendance, and final project grades.
Attendance: Mandatory. 2 absences will be allowed per semester.
Course Objective: Provide students with the basic techniques and concepts utilized in vocal jazz arranging including:
• Analyzing selected arrangements
• Playing short selections of selected arrangements on the piano (all voices)
• Arranging for rhythm section.
• Arranging an a cappella ballad for 4-6 voices (SATB)
• Arranging a song for 4-6 voices with rhythm section accompaniment
• Chord voicings and voice leading for vocal groups.
• Performance and recording of the two large projects.